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Bygones: 100 years ago, Duluth men refused low-paying jobs

Bygones is researched and written by David Ouse, retired reference librarian from the Duluth Public Library. He can be contacted at djouse49@gmail.com.

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News Tribune, June 2, 1982

  • The Duluth City Council yesterday approved a special employment program expected to provide 347 jobs for Duluth residents who are ineligible for unemployment compensation. The people hired would earn $4 an hour cleaning parks, trails, and creeks for nine weeks.
  • The Central Mesabi Medical Center in Hibbing is experiencing a 25 percent decline in patient admissions. Officials say one reason for the decline is that many Iron Range residents have been laid off and are without medical insurance.

News Tribune, June 2, 1922

  • After devastating more than 100 acres of land and 100,000 feet of white pine, the first serious forest fire of the year was brought under control yesterday northeast of Duluth. A campfire left burning by woodsmen is believed to have started the blaze.
  • Some Duluth men are refusing to accept job offers because the pay is too low, according to Joseph Burke, manager of the Minnesota Free Employment Bureau. Existing wages being offered range from $2.50 to $3.25 for a 10-hour day.
Related Topics: BYGONESHISTORY
Bygones is researched and written by David Ouse, retired reference librarian from the Duluth Public Library. He can be contacted at djouse49@gmail.com.
What To Read Next
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It opened in 2018 on Tower Avenue.
Also in today’s episode, mushers take to the Beargrease course and more.
Bygones is researched and written by David Ouse, retired reference librarian from the Duluth Public Library. He can be contacted at djouse49@gmail.com.