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Hiring officers is a lengthy process

Most of the recruits applying to become Duluth police officers already have earned their college degrees in law enforcement -- four-year degrees are becoming more common -- and have been verified by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards ...

Most of the recruits applying to become Duluth police officers already have earned their college degrees in law enforcement - four-year degrees are becoming more common - and have been verified by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training. They also already have received their skills certificate showing they can perform basic police functions.
The hiring process is lengthy. Duluth advertised the positions in December. Of the 60 candidates who passed their written civil service test in January and went on to interview with the department last week, the best combined written and verbal scores will be ranked by the city’s Civil Service Board, said Lt. Nick Lukovsky, training officer for the Duluth department.
The board will provide a list of the top finalists back to Chief Gordon Ramsay, and police officials will conduct elaborate background checks on each - not just criminal but also the candidate’s social, family and employment history.
Those ranked highest will come back for yet another round of oral interviews with both a “chief’s panel’’ including Ramsay and a “background panel’’ that will query the recruits about their past - from their performance at past jobs to their personal relationships.
Members of the two panels meet and discuss the candidates and eventually agree on a list of potential officers. This time, Ramsay said he’s looking to fill six positions, which would bring the department up to 152 officers - at least until the next senior officers retire.
The department then will make a conditional offer of employment, pending a psychological evaluation and physical examination. If they pass both, the city makes a final offer of employment. Their first day on the job may not happen until June, more than six months after the positions were advertised, Lukovsky noted.
The department usually hires new officers once or twice each year and then runs the newcomers through a rookie academy before they graduate onto regular duty.

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