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Haitian women's work showcased at quilt show

Though much has been written about all of the humanitarian efforts extended to the people of Haiti since the recent earthquake, a small group of Haitian women has already learned how to "pay it forward."...

Though much has been written about all of the humanitarian efforts extended to the people of Haiti since the recent earthquake, a small group of Haitian women has already learned how to "pay it forward."

Quilt pieces embroidered by Haitian women and turned into table runners are among the artful items to be displayed Saturday at a quilt show from 9:30 to 3 p.m. at Asbury United Methodist Church, 6822 Grand Ave., across from the Lake Superior Zoo.

Also on display will be more than 100 quilts and wall hangings made by quilters from Cloquet, Esko, Carlton and Duluth.

Barb Little of Cloquet, a member of Asbury, explained the Haiti connection.

"The women of my church knew that I travel to Haiti often," she said, "and they asked me if I would take some quilt squares on my next trip and have the Haitian women embroider them while I was there."

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And so, on her 2009 trip to Haiti as part of the Haiti Outreach project, Little brought 20 quilt squares with her to the small village of Pignon, about 60 miles north of Port-au-Prince.

"I just gave the women the squares and they drew their own designs freehand and then did their own thing," Little said. "To me, it's a matter of letting them be creative and use their own talents, and they're very good at doing that."

After Little returned from Haiti, she and a group of women from Asbury set to work last fall putting the squares together into table runners.

"It was then the thought occurred to us that we ought to have a quilt show in order to let others see them as well," Little said.

They decided to give half of the show's proceeds to Haiti Outreach and half to their church's many mission projects in Duluth.

Other displays include the quilts of Joanne Larsen-Line, who documented the quilt patterns featured in the popular book "The Quiltmaker's Gift," antique quilts, Christmas quilts, a vintage Singer treadle sewing machine, an old quilting frame and other quilt-

*elated decor from the 1920s.

Admission is $5 and includes coffee and bars.

Related Topics: CLOQUET
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