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Northland leaders praise Klobuchar's record, work ethic

Crowds gather to cheer for U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, who kicked off her campaign for president of the United States, Sunday in Minneapolis. Scott Takushi / St. Paul Pioneer Press

On a snowy, classically Minnesotan afternoon in Minneapolis, U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar announced her intention to run for president in 2020, joining a growing field of Democrats.

In her speech, Klobuchar, 58, thanked Greater Minnesota and mentioned her Northland ties. Democrats in the Northland, too, had words of praise for the three-term senator.

District 7B Rep. Liz Olson of Duluth said it was important to have another strong woman in the race.

"She's a very popular U.S. Senator who's really effective at passing legislation," Olson said Sunday. "She has an ability to cross the aisle, regardless of the political climate. She's good for Minnesota, and seeing people turn out (on such a snowy day) showcases people's excitement here."

District 7A Rep. Jennifer Schultz of Duluth took to Twitter after Klobuchar's announcement: "@amyklobuchar will lead with her heart & her head to fight for everyone. I'm with Amy. Please join us."

Beyond the political realm, St. Louis County Attorney Mark Rubin said Klobuchar is truly running for the people. Rubin has known Klobuchar since she was Hennepin County attorney in the 1990s and early 2000s.

"This isn't a person who's seeking power," he said Sunday. "She holds the power of the people of Minnesota. She speaks for us. I think she definitely speaks for all of America. We'd be well-served right now with someone with that kind of character and integrity."

Back in Minneapolis, Duluth Mayor Emily Larson joined Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey on stage before Klobuchar's announcement Sunday to help introduce the candidate.

"Duluth is a working city. We are a port city, a proud labor city on the Great Lakes that helped to build this country, that still powers our economy and our world," Larson said. "We ship the taconite to forge American steel, the grain to feed our world, and we brew a pretty good beer, too.

"Some politicians, some pundits, they look at parts of our beautiful country, our Midwest area, and they put us down, saying the best is behind us," she said. "They look at our proud history and they use it to divide us. But we know that across the Great Lakes, from Cleveland to Milwaukee, the story of Duluth, of innovation, of entrepreneurship and hard work, is thriving. And Amy knows that, too. She doesn't see a struggle and lose interest. She sees potential, and she gets to work. That is the true reason for optimism about the future of this country — a future for every single one of us.

"Our Amy is a real leader. She is honest. She is optimistic. She knows the value of hard work. ... She knows the Democratic party shouldn't and can't leave anyone behind."

Adelie Bergstrom

Adelie has been a reporter, editor and graphic designer for the News Tribune since 2012. (Her name rhymes with “Natalie.”) She began her career as a police reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Adelie also is an artist, photographer and model. She's a girl of the North with a whimsical streak and a love for Scandinavia, the Northern Lights, quirky films and anything mid-century. Contact her in the newsroom at (218) 720-4154.

(218) 720-4154
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