ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Fundraiser drenched in chocolate makes big hit

Heather Opsahl hasn't missed a single one of the 10 Death by Chocolate events in Duluth. "It's my favorite day," Opsahl said. "I live for chocolate. It's my biggest weakness." This time, she introduced her 13-year-old niece, Jazz Evavold of Dulut...

Heather Opsahl hasn't missed a single one of the 10 Death by Chocolate events in Duluth.

"It's my favorite day," Opsahl said. "I live for chocolate. It's my biggest weakness."

This time, she introduced her 13-year-old niece, Jazz Evavold of Duluth, to the traditional chocolate lover's event.

"They're yummy," Jazz said of the treats.

Death by Chocolate featured 12 local chefs and coffee purveyors serving handmade chocolate creations. Hosted by the Arrowhead Professional Chef's Association and Arc Northland, the event benefits programs of both nonprofits. Arc serves people with disabilities and their families, primarily in Northeastern Minnesota, while the chef's association helps educate and train aspiring chefs, promotes nutrition education in schools and helps local food shelves.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jackson Kolo, 10, came from Hibbing with his mother and grandparents for the event, which ran for two hours over lunch at Duluth's Radisson Hotel Harborview.

"It's pretty good," Kolo said as he ate a strawberry that had been covered with chocolate before his eyes a minute before.

Tuesday was Kolo's first experience of Death by Chocolate, but not his mother's or grandparents'.

"We've probably been down eight or nine times," said Jackson's mother, LeAnn Kolo. "We're down here for the chocolate. What better reason to take a day off of work and pull Jackson out of school?"

More than 300 people attended this year's event.

"It was probably the biggest year ever," Arc Northland Development Director Jeni Torgerson said. "It went very, very well. People loved the chocolate."

What To Read Next
The system crashed earlier this month, grounding flights across the U.S.