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Duluth students spread the word about healthy sleep

Just in time to remind Americans to turn their clocks back Saturday night, Duluth school children are spreading the news across the nation about the importance of healthy sleep.

Just in time to remind Americans to turn their clocks back Saturday night, Duluth school children are spreading the news across the nation about the importance of healthy sleep.
Nancy Gill's third-grade class at Lester Park Elementary School was filmed Tuesday for a video news release that will be fed via satellite to television networks nationwide as a reminder of the importance of adequate sleep as we turn our clocks back to return to standard time.
Elizabeth Gay, a producer for Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide in Washington, D.C., flew into town to oversee the taping of the video. Duluth's Parthe Film and Video Production filmed the children as they learned lessons on healthy sleep from their teacher.
"The children were well-behaved, cute kids, and they were very enthusiastic," Gay said.
The video showcased the Sleep Well, Do Well Star Sleeper Campaign, which teaches children the importance of establishing lifelong healthy sleep habits. The program and video are sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, an arm of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. With local underwriting costs provided by Murphy McGinnis Media, Duluth became the first school district in the country to adopt the program, and most third-grade classes in Duluth have been participating in the program the past two weeks.
"We filmed them going through the activities from the Garfield Star Sleeper book, and Mrs. Gill took them through all the important steps to getting good sleep, including not exercising before going to sleep, not eating a big meal before bed, having some quiet time to relax. The kids were very engaged, and Mrs. Gill is very talented. You couldn't even tell there was a camera in the room," Gay said.
Local and national television stations across the country will receive the video Friday. They can use the shots from Duluth to produce their own news segments on the importance of getting enough sleep. Many weekend news programs will air stories about sleep this weekend as daylight-saving time expires at 2 a.m. Sunday and Americans turn their clocks back one hour.
Gay said the Duluth children were perfect for the role as educators on the importance of healthy sleep habits.
"They looked like pros," she said. "They looked like they walked right out of central casting. They were adorable."

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