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DSSO season concludes this week

Saturday at the DECC auditorium, the 70th season of the DSSO will close on a dramatic note with a concert that "stretches the orchestral capacity to the nth degree," DSSO Conductor Markand Thakar said. "We've built incredible emotional momentum t...

Saturday at the DECC auditorium, the 70th season of the DSSO will close on a dramatic note with a concert that "stretches the orchestral capacity to the nth degree," DSSO Conductor Markand Thakar said. "We've built incredible emotional momentum through the season. This program caps it all."
"The Mahler symphony, paired with J.S. Bach's 'First Orchestral Suite,' promises to provide the grandest of grand finales to what has been, for me, a hugely gratifying season," Thakar noted in a DSSO press release.
The two works strike very different chords in the listener. While both composers are known for their technical complexity, Bach's suite offers listeners spiritual, pure-sounding passages, while Mahler's "Titan Symphony" hits every range of the emotional spectrum from serene to explosive.
Bach wrote the orchestral suite after taking the position of music director at the court of Prince Leopold, where he had an opportunity to both conduct a fine ensemble and compose secular music. The Duluth-Superior Symphony Orchestra has never performed this first suite before, but Bach's second suite was performed in 1980 and his third twice in the 1970s.
Mahler's 1888 "Titan" represents the Modernist era in music and was written in six weeks. It was originally conceived as a tone poem.
"I can't think of a more fitting way to end my first season as music director than with the titanic power and breadth of 'Titan,'" Thakar said. "In terms of the range of emotions, you can't beat Mahler."
The work shows off every section of the orchestra as it builds from exquisitely sensitive and quiet moments to its triumphant ending.
Thakar, closing out his first year with the orchestra, has inspired its members.
"Markand challenges the players to get out of their comfort zone," said Jim Pospisil, principal horn. "He reaches for the sublime experience, essentially asking the performers to collaborate with the composer, in this case Mahler. The intent is to create a profound musical experience that the audience can share in. The strength of Markand is that he is subservient to the music. It's not about his ego. It's about making the music as beautiful as possible. That is a rare quality in conductors. That is Markand's gift."
Tickets to the season finale concert, "Music Director and His Orchestra" range from $16.50 to $38 and are available at the symphony office (733-7579) at the Depot, at the DSSO Web site ( http://www.dsso.com ), at the DECC ticket office or through TicketMaster. Seniors 65 and older receive $2 off each ticket. Youths ages 6-17 are admitted for half price.

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