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Dick Palmer: The 'lies' have it

The presidential election this fall is pitting logic against deceit, and principal candidates for public office are getting away with it ... again. Frankly, I am appalled with the gall of Vice President Al Gore for denouncing the drug industry th...

The presidential election this fall is pitting logic against deceit, and principal candidates for public office are getting away with it ... again. Frankly, I am appalled with the gall of Vice President Al Gore for denouncing the drug industry the other day in Florida, stating his dog's prescription for Etogesic, the animal equivalent of Lodine, was considerably cheaper than his mother-in-law's.
His statement was, of course, a bold-faced lie, and he readily admitted it when he was called on the carpet. His own political supporters denounced the statement that was reportedly made up by Gore himself. He was caught in this little fib, but, of course, is weaseling out of it just like he did for broadly stating he invented the Internet. Ha ha, he didn't mean it, but what the heck, enough people believed him, and he got away with it ... again.
What is it going to take to get the American people back on track and properly define the differences between the two candidates, Gore and Gov. George W. Bush, for what they stand for? Instead, we are getting a facetious play on words and emotions directed at various segments of our society. In Gore's absurd statement about drug prices, he was playing to the emotions of Florida's nearly 3-million senior citizens. Never mind the truth, just stir the pot anyway you can. Shame on you Al Gore.
All this is not new to the American political scene. During the Clinton/Gore administration, lie after lie complicated the path of logical government. Even Attorney General Janet Reno failed to take action in a logical investigation of Gore's 1996 campaign fund raising with Buddhist monks. That big kiss between Gore and wife Tipper at the Democratic Convention was orchestrated, and it worked. More women suddenly are looking at Gore through emotion rather than logic. Ah yes, Show Biz is the name of the game, never mind telling the truth.
The real issue in this year's presidential election is to define the difference between a Republican and Democratic agenda. The U.S. economy is strong and growing, and the leadership for all this has come from entrepreneurs like Bill Gates, not governmental leaders. That is really the big difference here. Democrat Al Gore wants more federal government in our lives, and Republican Bush thinks just the opposite.
Less government gives us more freedom and incentive, and since 1995 when a Republican Congress has had an opportunity for leadership, in spite of Clinton, America is better off for it. That's the major issue this fall, More federal government or less federal government. Please think about that. The choice is yours.
Dick Palmer is the former editor and publisher of the Budgeteer News. He may be reached by telephone at 729-6470 or by e-mail at RPalmer341@aol.com

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