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Dick Palmer: Candidates sending mixed signals

We are soon coming into September. The primary elections are less than two weeks away, and then, with just a snap of our fingers, it will be Nov. 8. The national and state elections will be over, a new president will be elected, and we can start ...

We are soon coming into September. The primary elections are less than two weeks away, and then, with just a snap of our fingers, it will be Nov. 8. The national and state elections will be over, a new president will be elected, and we can start focusing on the 2001 City Council races.
Somewhere in the middle of all this, we, as Americans, have lost our focus, and it's not entirely our fault. It's the system that is deceitful and self-serving.
To this point, the presidential elections seem to be without innovation or serious direction. It is the same old tactic that has perpetuated a class warfare strategy that continues to pit the so-called haves against the have-nots. Never mind sorting out the truth in all this rhetoric, just follow simple party lines and let others do the thinking.
Is America strong financially today? Of course, it is. Americans are making progress, saving more, investing more wisely, but we have been duped with a false sense of security that could backfire on us at any time. Our military needs more than lip flapping.
One of the major innovators in our successful economic climate is the high tech environment. The space race of the 1960s actually developed a whole new economic base that benefited the United States first and has now spread around the world. Innovators like Bill Gates and others have developed most of this achievement, and their foresight is the primary contributing factor to our economic surge. But all is not well here, and the current presidential campaigns are not seriously addressing the opportunities that are facing the electorate.
The Gore campaign seems to be more organized at the present. Gore, the liberal, has teamed with Joe Lieberman, the conservative, putting some perceived balance to the rhetoric. The problem is, if elected, Gore will run the show, and Lieberman will be relegated to obscure details not often covered by the national press. That's the way it is.
On the other hand, George W. Bush simply cannot get his message across that giving a portion of the excess taxes collected back to the people would stimulate the economy even more. Instead, he is being dubbed a tool of the rich, and he cannot shake that image.
Bush needs to step back and take a look at his strategy. He can throw rocks at Al Gore and accuse him of illegal campaign finance activities back in 1996, but without proof, he is only throwing rocks into the water. Gore says he will take the excess tax money, and, with federal direction, spend it" wisely." Again, he has not been able to lay out a plan on paper that an average citizens can relate to.
The bottom line is obvious. The presidential campaigns are filled with ambiguity and nonsense designed to divide and conquer. Hey gentlemen, as voters we may seem disenfranchised, but we're not stupid.
Dick Palmer is the former editor and publisher of the Budgeteer News. He may be reached by telephne at 729-6470 or by e-mail at RPalmer341@aol.com

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