ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

CSS welcomes largest crop of students

The College of St. Scholastica has been a busy place, as a record number of students showed up for the new academic year amidst several campus improvement projects.

The College of St. Scholastica has been a busy place, as a record number of students showed up for the new academic year amidst several campus improvement projects.

While some construction workers were putting final touches on new students' quarters, others were expanding parking or moving earth in preparation for the new fitness facility.

Enrollment is up 9 percent according to Brian Dalton, college vice president for enrollment management. That translates to 2,750 students, up from 2,518 last year and 2,015 in 1998.

Leading the growth is the incoming freshman class, which is 52 percent larger than it was five years ago. The number of students transferring in from other colleges has also increased significantly, as have the number of evening students.

"At one time this was a sleepy place in the evening," said Dalton. "Right now it is emerging into something we want to see -- all levels of learning going on."

ADVERTISEMENT

While the college is a well known option for students in the Arrowhead region, Bob Ashenmacher, college director of communications, said positive national publicity has spread the school's reputation. And alumni satisfaction has been another factor.

"We have students from 19 countries and 43 states," said Dalton. "Diversity is increasing, it's a priority."

The college has also capitalized on the demand for nurses, and Dalton said it has become the most popular program.

"The College of St. Scholastica has responded to accommodate more students and will probably do so next year," he said. "No one is predicting when the nursing demand will end. We are positioning ourselves to meet that demand."

Ashenmacher said the college has the only seamless bachelor to master degree nursing program in the nation. It enables students to plan their undergraduate and graduate degree as one program at the same school.

Other popular majors are pre-professional programs that point students toward further study in law, medicine or dentistry.

What To Read Next
The system crashed earlier this month, grounding flights across the U.S.