ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Commentary: Perks set stage for community soul-searching

Herb Palmer's Nuggets column, found on Page C8 in this week's Budgeteer, addresses the growing need for employers to seek good employees and then do everything possible to keep them. His column is quite interesting, so I decided to put our fair c...

Herb Palmer's Nuggets column, found on Page C8 in this week's Budgeteer, addresses the growing need for employers to seek good employees and then do everything possible to keep them. His column is quite interesting, so I decided to put our fair city into the equation and see how it fits a national trend that is betting on America's future by using today's employment needs to redesign the workplace road map. Naturally, my concern deals with Duluth and area, and I see a huge contrast in growth, security, investment and opportunity between Duluth and other communities. Why is that, one ponders?
To speculate on symptoms that help or hinder economic growth is for the politicians to play with. They seem to have an opinion on most people issues. However, cutting the chaff and analyzing our market is really quite easy to do because of obvious differences in attitudes and opportunities. Look at the difference in economic growth and prosperity between the Twin Cities and Duluth. Which community would you rather live in, raise your family in and enjoy?
After you read Herb's Nuggets, ask yourself, as an employer, if you are really interested in retaining a dependable, loyal workforce, and if you are doing your best to keep your employees happy? This is exactly what employers throughout the country are doing and the system is working.
There has been a long strike in our city. One has to wonder if there is a solution that would resolve this economic catastrophe and prevent future labor unrest without picket signs. Consider the terrible hardship on families who are innocent players without a voice.
I see Duluth with a perceived 20/20 vision pointing to a great future. We need to look at ourselves in the mirror and ponder the consequences of not doing everything possible to exploit our good points and minimize our downside with confidence and enthusiasm. Keeping good employees is more than a wage contract; it involves personal interest and cooperation which, ultimately, will stimulate business growth, security and more opportunity.
The other side of the coin is an old issue we continue to bring up. People coming into Duluth need more than a job; they need to see a community eager to provide goods and services that are appealing to varied interests. We need that golf course on the hill, and we need continued civic diversion.
Few realize the importance of a university that has an enrollment waiting list, which is the case at UMD. The waterfront development is definitely a step in the right direction, and I could go on here.
What is missing in Duluth is communitywide enthusiasm. We need to remain proud of our community and seek continuous change. Change is the road map for Duluth's future.

What To Read Next
The system crashed earlier this month, grounding flights across the U.S.