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Candidates abound in Minnesota governor's race

Here is a look at Minne-sota governor candidates who have filed paperwork with state officials to collect and spend contributions. Filing of papers to actually become a candidate does not happen until next year.

Here is a look at Minne-sota governor candidates who have filed paperwork with state officials to collect and spend contributions. Filing of papers to actually become a candidate does not happen until next year.

Democrats

  • Tom Bakk. State senator from Cook and chairman of the Senate Taxes Com-mittee.
  • Mark Dayton. Former state auditor and former U.S. senator comes from one of the state's most famous business families.
  • Matt Entenza. Former state House minority leader from St. Paul ran into trouble and was forced out of the 2006 attorney general race.
  • Susan Gaertner. Ramsey County attorney has been running for some time, visiting all parts of Minnesota.
  • Steve Kelley. Former state senator from Hopkins mostly is known for his work on education and his failed 2006 attorney general run.
  • Margaret Anderson Kelliher. Two terms as House speaker gave the Minneapolis resident lots of notoriety, but failure to reach budget deal with governor may hurt.
  • John Marty. Roseville state senator known for efforts to tighten politicians' ethics laws ran for governor once before.
  • Tom Rukavina. Perhaps the most colorful state representative, the Virginia resident is House higher education and work force chairman.
  • Ole Savior. It would not be an election without the Minneapolis artist running for a statewide office and losing badly.
  • Paul Thissen. Four-term state representative from Minneapolis is best known for his work on health-care legislation. Republicans

  • Pat Anderson. Former state auditor and Eagan mayor lost re-election as auditor in the Democratic year of 2006.
  • Leslie Davis. Not normally a Republican, Davis is a perennial candidate and environmentalist.
  • Tom Emmer. Delano state representative is one of the House's most prolific speakers and one of its most conservative members.
  • Bill Haas. Ex-state representative is little known outside his Champlin-area district and the Capitol.
  • David Hann. State senator from Eden Prairie has become a conservative spokesman in his two terms.
  • Philip Herwig. While the first to file paperwork to run, the Milaca resident's campaign has gained little notice.
  • Michael Jungbauer. Two-term state senator from East Bethel is a water resources manager and minister to dirt bikers.
  • Paul Kohls. Victoria state representative is among the young lawmakers who often rises to promote conservative ideals during debates.
  • Marty Seifert. A Marshall state representative, Seifert was the first big-name Republican to get into the race and he has extensively traveled the state. Potential candidates who might yet enter the race

  • Chris Coleman, Democrat. St. Paul mayor faces a November election, but indicates he leans toward running for governor.
  • Mike Hatch, Democrat. While the former attorney general and 2006 governor candidate from Burnsville has not said he wants to run, some Democrats expect him to.
  • R.T. Rybak. Democrat. Minneapolis mayor strongly hints he will run, but politically cannot make an announcement until after November's city election.
  • Norm Coleman, Republican. Former U.S. senator says he will not decide about the governor's race until next year, but would be a contender if he gets in.
  • Michele Bachman, Republican. Congresswoman wants to stay where she is, unless "the Lord" guides her to a presidential run.
  • Rod Grams, Republican. Former U.S. senator from Crown, who lost re-election to Mark Dayton, remains a potential candidate and is a GOP favorite.
  • Carol Molnau, Republican. The lieutenant governor, who farms southwest of the Twin Cities, says she will wait to decide until after a late-October family meeting.
  • Jim Ramstad, Republican. The former congressmen from the western Twin Cities opted out of the race earlier this year, but on Friday left the door slightly open.
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