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Bill Holm to read here, expected to bring down the house

NEWS TO USE Bill Holm will read from his work at Somers Lounge on the campus of the College of St. Scholastica at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, as part of the Spirit Lake Poetry Series. Refreshments will be served. Admission is free. A book signing...

NEWS TO USE
Bill Holm will read from his work at Somers Lounge on the campus of the College of St. Scholastica at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, as part of the Spirit Lake Poetry Series. Refreshments will be served.
Admission is free. A book signing will follow the reading.
Poet, essayist and composer Bill Holm will read from his work at the College of St. Scholastica on Saturday, Nov. 3. It should be quite a performance.
"Bill is always fun to listen to. You don't know what he'll do. He's a Minnesota original," said Duluth poet Louis Jenkins, who has known Holm for years.
"I don't know exactly how I met him," Jenkins said. "We probably met each other originally through Robert Bly. But we've done some things together, poetry readings and other stuff. I've known Bill for a long time."
In fact, Jenkins said he knows Holm well enough to know there's no predicting exactly what Holmes will do at the Spirit Lake Poetry reading on Saturday night.
Holm is an accomplished musician as well as a respected writer who energetically follows his interests.
As a press release written by Duluth poet Barton Sutter put it, "Holm hails from Minneota where he lives with two pianos, a clavichord, thousands of books and no TV."
One of the features of Somers Lounge where Holm will read is a well-tuned piano.
"We hope he'll pound on that a little bit," Jenkins said. "He's a trained classical musician, but he plays all kinds of music -- ragtime, jazz -- so who knows? He's a funny guy and a real stage presence."
Jenkins and Sutter both said Holm's spirited readings are often full of surprises.
"On any given night, Holm might read his own poems, recite from the classics, play Bach or ragtime, tell stories on his neighbors, deliver an eloquent political rant or lead his audience in song," Sutter wrote.
Garrison Keillor reportedly calls Holm "the tallest radical humorist in the Midwest and a truthful and wonderful writer."
Holm is the author of two books of poetry -- "Box Elder Bug Variations" and "The Dead Get By with Everything." He has also earned a reputation as one of the nation's most intriguing essayists.
"The Music of Failure," "A Landscape of Ghosts" and "The Heart Can Be Filled Anywhere on Earth" focus on his home region in southwestern Minnesota. "Eccentric Islands" and "Coming Home Crazy" report on his travels in Iceland, China and Madagascar.
Jenkins, who read some of his own poetry on Keillor's show last weekend, said he has been reading Holm's latest travel book "Eccentric Islands" and enjoying it a lot.
The reading on Saturday should be just as entertaining, he said. Admission is free.

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