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August shipping remains steady

U.S. ships on the Great Lakes carried 10 million tons of cargo last month, similar to August 2017's totals and in line with the month's 5-year average.

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U.S. ships on the Great Lakes carried 10 million tons of cargo last month, similar to August 2017's totals and in line with the month's 5-year average.

Iron ore cargos topped 5 million tons for the month of August, up 6.8 percent compared to a year ago, according to numbers released by the Lake Carriers' Association on Tuesday.

However, year-to-date cargo from U.S.-flag ships was reported at 48.4 million tons through August, down 4.1 percent from this point last year. Year-to-date totals for iron ore, coal, cement, and salt are down, but cargos of limestone, sand and grain are up.

The Great Lakes Seaway Partnership, which tracks cargo through the St. Lawrence Seaway, also reported numbers Tuesday.

The organization's year-to-date totals showed 21.4 million metric tons of cargo moving through the seaway in August, a 4 percent increase from August 2017.

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"The Seaway enjoyed its strongest August over the last four years," Craig H. Middlebrook, deputy administrator of the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation said in a statement. "This is good news as we pass the midpoint of the navigation season."

Related Topics: SHIPPINGGREAT LAKES
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