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Ask a Trooper: How long do tickets stay on record

Q: How long does a speeding ticket and written warning ticket stay on your record? A: A written warning does not go on your driving record, but it is recorded in our computer system. As for citations for speed, according to the Minnesota Departme...

Sgt. Neil Dickenson
Sgt. Neil Dickenson
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Q: How long does a speeding ticket and written warning ticket stay on your record?

A: A written warning does not go on your driving record, but it is recorded in our computer system. As for citations for speed, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety’s Driver and Vehicle Services division, speeding tickets generally stay on record for five years; serious speeding violations stay on record for 10 years.
Each year, illegal or unsafe speed is one of the leading contributing factors in Minnesota’s fatal crashes.
Costs of speeding violations vary by county, but typically are at least $120 for traveling 10 mph over the limit. Motorists stopped at 20 mph over the speed limit face double the fine, and those ticketed traveling more than 100 mph can lose their license for six months.
Speeding is not an innocent crime - it puts every motorist at risk on the road:

  • Greater potential for loss of vehicle control.
  • Increased stopping distance.
  • Less time available for driver response for crash avoidance.
  • Increased crash severity - the faster the speed, the more violent the crash.

A portion of state statutes were used with permission from the Office of the Revisor of Statutes. If you have any questions concerning traffic related laws or issues in Minnesota, send your questions to to  trooper@duluthnews.com  or to  Sgt. Neil Dickenson – Minnesota State Patrol at 1131 Mesaba Ave, Duluth, MN 55811.  You can follow him on Twitter @MSPPIO_NE or reach him at neil.dickenson@state.mn.us

Related Topics: POLICECRIME
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