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Arlington Avenue construction starts Monday

If you regularly use Arlington Avenue in Duluth Heights, you may want to find an alternative route for a couple of months. The St. Louis County Public Works Department will start a major resurfacing project Monday on Arlington from Trinity Road (U.S.

If you regularly use Arlington Avenue in Duluth Heights, you may want to find an alternative route for a couple of months. The St. Louis County Public Works Department will start a major resurfacing project Monday on Arlington from Trinity Road (U.S. Highway 53) to Arrowhead Road. The nearly three-mile, $2.6 million project should be completed by Oct. 19. Crews will be removing all the old blacktop down to the dirt, upgrading some curbs and gutters and improving sidewalk access before a new layer of blacktop is laid down.
There will be stretches where parts of the road will be partially closed and parts will be entirely closed, said Steve Krasaway, project engineer for the county. From Aug. 17 through Aug. 31, the entire road will be closed to through traffic from Trinity to Central Entrance. Homeowners and people going to the Arlington Avenue soccer complex will be able to get in from one side or the other, depending on the progress of the project, Krasaway said. Then, starting about Sept. 7, Arlington will be entirely closed from Central Entrance to Arrowhead Road, also for 15 days. Again, only homeowners along the route will be able to use the road at that time. Arlington Avenue sees about 11,000 vehicles per day. "It's going to be a big inconvenience to a lot of people to have these closures. But the longer we have the road closed, the sooner we can finish the project," Krasaway said. Even when the road is partially open "it's going to be a headache. There will be delays. I'd avoid using Arlington altogether until this project is done," he said. Anyone who shops in St. Louis County is helping pay for the project. About $500,000 is coming for the county's new half-cent transportation sales tax that began April 1, while about $2 million is federal highway aid. Northland Constructors is handling the work.If you regularly use Arlington Avenue in Duluth Heights, you may want to find an alternative route for a couple of months.The St. Louis County Public Works Department will start a major resurfacing project Monday on Arlington from Trinity Road (U.S. Highway 53) to Arrowhead Road.The nearly three-mile, $2.6 million project should be completed by Oct. 19.Crews will be removing all the old blacktop down to the dirt, upgrading some curbs and gutters and improving sidewalk access before a new layer of blacktop is laid down.
There will be stretches where parts of the road will be partially closed and parts will be entirely closed, said Steve Krasaway, project engineer for the county.From Aug. 17 through Aug. 31, the entire road will be closed to through traffic from Trinity to Central Entrance. Homeowners and people going to the Arlington Avenue soccer complex will be able to get in from one side or the other, depending on the progress of the project, Krasaway said.Then, starting about Sept. 7, Arlington will be entirely closed from Central Entrance to Arrowhead Road, also for 15 days. Again, only homeowners along the route will be able to use the road at that time.Arlington Avenue sees about 11,000 vehicles per day."It's going to be a big inconvenience to a lot of people to have these closures. But the longer we have the road closed, the sooner we can finish the project," Krasaway said.Even when the road is partially open "it's going to be a headache. There will be delays. I'd avoid using Arlington altogether until this project is done," he said.Anyone who shops in St. Louis County is helping pay for the project. About $500,000 is coming for the county's new half-cent transportation sales tax that began April 1, while about $2 million is federal highway aid.Northland Constructors is handling the work.

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.
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