They come from all over the world.

They carry iron ore, grain, limestone, coal, wind turbine parts and more.

This summer has been a great one for ship watching.

Jayson Hron, director of communication and marketing for the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, said the port saw 79 vessel arrivals in June, which is 18 more than June 2020.

The John G. Munson passes underneath the Bong Bridge in the St. Louis Bay in 2017. Areas along Duluth and Superior's inner harbor provide a great vantage point to view the ships. 
Contributed / Paul Scinocca
The John G. Munson passes underneath the Bong Bridge in the St. Louis Bay in 2017. Areas along Duluth and Superior's inner harbor provide a great vantage point to view the ships. Contributed / Paul Scinocca

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“It never gets old watching the ships come in the port and leave the port because it’s a sign of prosperity for this region,” Hron said.

He, along with Sara Summers-Luedtke, director of the Lake Superior Maritime Visitors Center in Canal Park, and Paul Scinocca, photographer and self-described "boat nerd," share their favorite tips, boat tracking apps and places in Duluth and Superior to watch the ships come and go.

“I’ve seen all of them. I’ve seen them in multiple phases of weather. And each time still amazes me,” Scinocca said.