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Quick Fix: Zucchini noodles star in summer 'pasta' salad

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Linda Gassenheimer Contributed / TNS
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I doctored up rotisserie or bought cooked chicken breast and used zucchini noodles to make this very quick and easy “pasta” salad. Zucchini is at its peak now, and here is a great way to use it. You can buy the zucchini noodles in the market or make your own using a spiralizer. There’s almost no cooking needed for this summer dish.

The salad is dressed with a mayonnaise sauce. Adding a little warm water to mayonnaise creates a smooth sauce that can be used in many recipes.

Helpful Hints:

  • If using rotisserie chicken, remove the skin and bones.
  • If zucchini noodles are not available, use angel hair pasta cooked according to package instructions.

Countdown:

  • Mix mayonnaise, water, horseradish and honey together.
  • Prepare other ingredients.
  • Make salad.

Shopping List:

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To buy: 3/4 pound bought rotisserie or cooked boneless, skinless chicken breast, 1 jar reduced-fat mayonnaise, 1 small jar prepared horseradish, 1 bottle honey, 1 bunch fresh basil, 1 container green beans, 1 container zucchini noodles, 1 bunch scallions, 1 red bell pepper, and 1 whole wheat baguette.

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CHICKEN AND ZUCCHINI NOODLES 'PASTA' SALAD

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

3 tablespoons reduced-fat mayonnaise

3 tablespoons warm water

2 tablespoons prepared horseradish

1 tablespoon honey

1/2 cup fresh basil leaves, torn into bite-size pieces

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1 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces

8 ounces zucchini noodles (about 2 cups)

3/4 pound bought rotisserie or cooked boneless, skinless chicken breast (about 2 cups)

1/2 cup sliced scallions

1 red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 1 cup)

2 slices whole wheat baguette

Mix mayonnaise with warm water until smooth. Mix in the horseradish and honey. Add half the basil pieces and reserve the rest to add to the finished salad. Microwave the green beans for one minute. Add the zucchini noodles, green beans, chicken, scallions and red bell pepper to a large bowl. Add the mayonnaise dressing and mix in with the salad ingredients. Divide the salad between two dinner plates and sprinkle the remaining basil pieces on top. Serve with the baguette.

Yield 2 servings.

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Per serving: 486 calories (26% from fat), 14.1 g fat (2.4 g saturated, 3.4 g monounsaturated), 147 mg cholesterol, 51.1 g protein, 38.5 g carbohydrates, 5.8 g fiber, 469 mg sodium.

Linda Gassenheimer is the author of over 30 cookbooks, including her newest, "The 12-Week Diabetes Cookbook." Listen to Linda on WDNA.org and all major podcast sites. Email her at linda@dinnerinminutes.com. ©2022 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Related Topics: FOODRECIPES
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