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Photos and video: Candy making the old fashioned way

Members of the Grambsch family returned to reopen their historic candy store in Depot Square inside the Lake Superior Railroad Museum at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, Nov. 27. 2021. The family makes hard candy by hand as guests watched the process and then tasted free samples.

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Teresa Grambsch Ullmann holds a tray of clove candy that Lake Superior Railroad Museum guests and visitors could get samples from outside the historic Grambsch Candy Kitchen at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, November 27, 2021. Dan Williamson / Duluth News Tribune

Guests were treated to tasty treats at the Lake Superior Railroad Museum at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, Nov. 27, as descendants of Ben Grambsch and his son Clyde Grambsch returned to reopen their historic candy store.

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Carmella Grambsch Anderson, right, daughter of the late Clyde Grambsch and granddaughter of the late Ben Grambsch, sits outside the historic Grambsch Candy Kitchen at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, November 27, 2021 and provides free samples of old fashioned clove candy to guests and visitors. Dan Williamson / Duluth News Tribune

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The Grambsch family makes hard candy by hand as museum guests and visitors watch the process that involves using an old copper kettle; a hard, marble cooling table, wooden forms; and molds. Free samples were provided.

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Chase Grambsch, left, and Irrissa Semler, center, organize pieces of clove candy inside the historic Grambsch Candy Kitchen at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, Nov. 27, 2021. Dan Williamson / Duluth News Tribune

The family's candy making dates back to the 1920s when Ben Grambsch, a carpenter out of work during the Great Depression, decided to make candy instead of pound nails. The family operated a candy store in Loyal, Wisconsin, for three generations before closing and donating the shop to the museum.

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Guests and visitors of the Lake Superior Railroad Museum wait in front of the window outside the historic Grambsch Candy Kitchen at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, Nov. 27, 2021. Dan Williamson / Duluth News Tribune

Since 1982, on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, family members reunite in Duluth to make candy using recipes and techniques passed down through five generations.

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Caid Klimpke, 5, left, of Loyal, Wis., and Eden Stieglitz, 9, of Loyal, Wis., both great-grand children of the late Clyde Grambsch, watch through the window outside the historic Grambsch Candy Kitchen at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, Nov. 27, 2021 as family members create old fashioned candy. Dan Williamson / Duluth News Tribune

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From right, Chase Grambsch, Caleb Grambsch, and Bob Grambsch work together while preparing a batch of candy inside the historic Grambsch Candy Kitchen at the St. Louis County Depot in Duluth on Saturday, Nov. 27, 2021. Carmella Grambsch Anderson, Bob's sister, left, monitors to line of guests waiting to sample the treats. Carmella Grambsch Anderson and Bob Grambsch learned the candy making techniques from their father, the late Clyde Grambsch, and grandfather, the late Ben Grambsch, and have taught those lessons to other generations of family members. Dan Williamson / Duluth News Tribune

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