Big Wave Dave, etc. (with ripple-side view)

A bit of bayside land gets its test as a music venue during the Concert for Recovery, a show by Duluth Bethel and the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center to benefit substance abuse treatment and mental health services. The lineup includes the local funk band Big Wave Dave & The Ripples, the bluesy Virgil Caine, the forever young rockers from A Band Called Truman, and South of Superior, fronted by the big gorgeous voice of Hannah Rey. The daylong event will be set up on Harbor Drive behind the DECC facing the Aerial Lift Bridge.

Concert for Recovery starts at 4 p.m. Sept. 25 on Harbor Drive. Tickets: $15 at eventbrite.com.

Stevie Nicks, vocalist for Fleetwood Mac, sings one of the of the group's songs on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019, at Spectrum Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. 
Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer / TNS
Stevie Nicks, vocalist for Fleetwood Mac, sings one of the of the group's songs on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019, at Spectrum Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer / TNS

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Duluth, or at least a couple handfuls of its musicians, is doing Fleetwood for an upcoming concert at Sacred Heart Music Center, the latest in a series that has found locals covering The White Album, Tom Petty or heck, their own friends from Low. This seems like a good time to dig into Fleetwood Mac, a band that doesn’t seem to ever go out of style. Last week the LA Times published a story about the never-ending feud between Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. Back on the homefront, Duluth Does Fleetwood Mac includes The Fishheads, George Ellsworth, Lyz Jaakola, Oshkii Giizhik Singers, Mississippi Mike and Shane Nelson covering songs like “Landslide,” “Rhiannon,” “Tusk,” “Go Your Own Way” and “Dreams.”

Duluth Does Fleetwood Mac is at 7 p.m. Sept. 25 at Sacred Heart Music Center, 201 W. Fourth St. Tickets: $10-15 at Globe News in Superior, Zenith Bookstore and online at sacredheartmusic.org.

Low's "Hey What" was released Sept. 10.
Contributed / Nathan Keay
Low's "Hey What" was released Sept. 10. Contributed / Nathan Keay

Get fuzzy with it

Music heads are digging the fresh, fuzzy, jarring and unpredictable new Low album, “Hey What,” the Duluth band’s follow up to “Double Negative.” Is there anything better than the sound of Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker twisting their voices together? Paste magazine described it as “a surge of information through a corroded terminal, or an electrical storm in the cavern between two earbuds.” NME, meanwhile, said “as the world has become more stark and hostile, so too has Low’s music,” in a review that adds, “Traditional sounds like guitar and drums hiss and splutter; the record is abrasive and unsettling.” (The unwritten add-on: “in a good way.”)

Maria Bamford voices Trophy in the new Adult Swim show "Teenage Euthanasia." 
Contributed / Adult Swim
Maria Bamford voices Trophy in the new Adult Swim show "Teenage Euthanasia." Contributed / Adult Swim

Bammer voices Trophy mom

Maria Bamford plays an undead role in the new series “Teenage Euthanasia,” which premiered last week on Adult Swim. She is Trophy, who ran away from her family — owners of Tender Endings Funeral Home in Florida — after giving birth to Euthanasia (AKA Annie) as a teenager. By the time she makes it back, she’s dead. According to a synopsis of the show, she comes back to life when her daughter’s tears mix with embalming fluid and lightning. (A trailer shows a hug between mother and daughter in which the latter coos over her mother’s smell “popcorn and gasoline,” before Trophy reveals the truth: it’s spray tan.

“Teenage Euthanasia” is available on Adult Swim.

Marc Gartman's Fever Dream's new album "Keile" considers the musician's great-grandmother. 
Contributed / Marc Gartman
Marc Gartman's Fever Dream's new album "Keile" considers the musician's great-grandmother. Contributed / Marc Gartman

Fever Dream pays tribute to great-grandma

On March 25, 1911, 146 factory employees — mostly young immigrant women — died in a fire at the Asch Building in Manhattan, a poorly designed structure with only one out of four working elevators, narrow staircases and doors that opened inward. Some workers were burned alive; others died after jumping from the ninth-floor windows.

Among the survivors: Duluth musician Marc Gartman’s great-grandmother, who he said fled Russia for New York City in 1906. Ultimately, her testimony from inside the scene — she escaped in the elevator, while some would die when they jumped down the shaft — of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory played a role in the manslaughter trials for the company’s owners Max Blanck and Isaac Harris. (They were acquitted of manslaughter charges, but were liable in a wrongful death suit.)

Marc Gartman’s Fever Dream has created an album about the early life of Kate Gartman — which includes the song “The Triangle.”

Gartman plays a release show at 6 p.m. Sept. 24 at Duluth Cider. Sadkin is also on the bill.