Lanue for you

Musician Sarah Krueger, self-described as feeling detached from the work of her past, recently recorded a new collection alongside a handful of well-traveled musicians from this region, including Steve Garrington of Low and JT Bates (Pieta Brown, Taylor Swift) and Trampled By Turtles’ Ryan Young. As Lanue, Krueger said she is still writing straightforward and earnest, nostalgic and confessional songs. This self-titled debut is described as a “fresh, creative backdrop.” “Lanue” is available for streaming on March 2. The video “What I Love the Most” was previously released.

Stream flicks, think of Zinema 2

Among the new buzzy movies available for streaming is “Minari,” the story of Korean immigrants who move across the United States to rural Arkansas to get into farming. Writer-director Lee Isaac Chung’s somewhat autobiographical story covers business troubles, the introduction of a grandmother to the family home and the young son David’s worrisome heart condition.

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"Minari" (Image from A24)
"Minari" (Image from A24)

The movie is distributed by A24 — but you can support Zinema 2 by signing up for a screening through the local movie theater’s website. The story, told from David’s perspective, ended up on dozens of critics’ best of 2020 lists, has picked up festival awards — including at Sundance — and is considered a contender for multiple Academy Awards.

It’s also worth combing through Zinema 2’s other options for so-hot-right-now streaming options.

"How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)

Ibram X. Kendi can teach you to be an antiracist

Ibram X. Kendi is among the featured speakers at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s 2021 Summit on Equity, Race and Ethnicity: “Being Antiracist, Doing Antiracism” with virtual sessions running March 2-4.

Kendi is the author of “How to Be an Antiracist,” “Stampled: Racism, Antiracism and You” and more. Tim Wise, author of “White Like Me” is also on the schedule. Meanwhile, there will be workshops, a racial justice organization fair, and the “We All Belong Creativity Exhibit” will be on display at UMD from 6-9 p.m. those same days. The all-campus art show focuses on the theme of antiracism with works ranging from poetry to video.

This event is open to the public. Donations are encouraged, but not required. Register at cere.d.umn.edu.

"White Zombie" (Universal Pictures)
"White Zombie" (Universal Pictures)

Bela Lugosi is up to no good

Speaking of movies — the films curated by Uncle Clutch aren’t going to be up for any awards this season. The skeletal-faced character who hosts the Superior Community Television show “Uncle Clutch’s Video Horror Shop” is offering “White Zombie” this weekend — a throwback to 1932 Bela Lugosi.

It’s the story of a woman who is turned into a zombie by a zombie master (Lugosi, of course). Vanity Fair called it the worst movie of 1932 — though it plays better critically as a cult classic. It has an 86% on the Tomatometer. Uncle Clutch curates a weekly hokey horror movie that is available on a literal TV channel near you (9 p.m. Fridays on Spectrum channel 180 in Superior, 188 in Duluth). It’s also on his YouTube channel.

Dominic Cheli (Image from dominiccheli.com)
Dominic Cheli (Image from dominiccheli.com)

More keys, please

Pianist Dominic Cheli is the featured soloist for the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra’s “Mendelssohn and Mozart” concert at 7 p.m. Feb. 27 — a program that also includes Shostakovich’s Chamber Symphony, where the program notes say listeners will experience “the tensions and wide range of emotions” the composer enduring in Soviet-controlled Russia. Cheli, described as “mesmerizing” and “his fingers were one with the keys” by the Los Angeles Times, will perform Mendelssohn’s Piano Concerto No. 1. The Mozart piece is Symphony No. 40.

The DSSO offers limited in-person seating at Symphony Hall, and also has streaming options available. For more information, go to dsso.com.

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Learn things, love winter

The Duluth Art Institute is offering a series of classes that pay homage to the season. “For the Love of Winter” is described as offering an opportunity to build a relationship with winter. How? Through knitting (taught by Kathy Thomas of Yarn Harbor via Zoom), snowshoeing to photo ops (Vern Northrup takes guests to the sugarbush to see winter in a different way), creating winter sculptures (Ann Klefstad teaches how to use temporary materials found in nature), and drawing en plein air — among snowscapes (Matt Kania has tips.) The series starts with Thomas, whose session is at 6 p.m. Feb. 26. For more information and to register, go to duluthartinstitute.org