Bedlam on a fall night

For Good Morning Bedlam’s newest music video, fans, friends and families sent home footage of themselves celebrating life and loved ones. The results: smiling humans flipping breakfast in the skillet, flying literal airplanes, doing back flips and power-lifting bodies. It’s pure joy.

The Minneapolis folk band released the vid for “Enough” in July.

Good Morning Bedlam plays at Earth Rider Festival Grounds. Photo from Facebook
Good Morning Bedlam plays at Earth Rider Festival Grounds. Photo from Facebook

Good Morning Bedlam is among the bands braving low temps to continue playing shows outdoors at Earth Rider Festival Grounds in Superior — which is good because this band is known for its super-festive live, in-person shows.

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Good Morning Bedlam plays at 5 p.m. Nov. 5 at Earth Rider Festival Grounds, 1617 N. Third St., Superior.

Bands will pay tribute to artists like Alanis Morissette, Van Halen and Rolling Stones on Saturday at Earth Rider Festival Grounds.
Bands will pay tribute to artists like Alanis Morissette, Van Halen and Rolling Stones on Saturday at Earth Rider Festival Grounds.

You oughta know

Also at the Earth Rider Festival Grounds: A tribute fest of sorts. A handful of bands will cover retro acts like Alanis Morissette’s “Jagged Little Pill” era, The Rolling Stones and Van Halen.

This, too, is outside from 6-9 p.m. on Nov. 7. There is a limited number of picnic tables, which can be reserved. The venue keepers are also advising you to BYOB — which this time means bring your own blanket.

Betsy Husby (dsso.com)
Betsy Husby (dsso.com)

Get up and dance

Betsy Husby, the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra’s principal cellist, will perform Cello Concerto No. 1 during “Afternoon Dances,” the DSSO’s second concert of a season that features smaller ensembles, streaming options and a limited number of patrons in the audience at Symphony Hall.

The program opens with Claude Debussy’s “Afternoon of a Faun,” and also includes Arvo Part’s “Fratres” and Igor Stravinsky’s “Danses Concertantes.”

The pieces are billed as being upbeat, whimsical, mesmerizing and bright.

The DSSO’s first concert was in mid-October, and reviewer Sheryl Jensen described masked and distanced musicians — including music director Dirk Meyer. “Despite what seemed a bit surreal at times with so few people in the audience and the players spaced apart from one another, the orchestra ably brought back the sweeping magic and majesty that symphonic music played well provides,” she wrote.

Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra’s “Afternoon Dances” is at 7 p.m. Nov. 7 at Symphony Hall or streaming. More info: dsso.com.

"Rear Window" will play as part of a Hitchcock retrospective at the West Theatre. Photo by Paramount Pictures
"Rear Window" will play as part of a Hitchcock retrospective at the West Theatre. Photo by Paramount Pictures

(Insert 'Psycho' theme song here)

West Theatre is in the midst of an Alfred Hitchcock retrospective, with more than a handful of suspense films to sink into — including “The Birds,” “Rear Window,” “Psycho” and more.

The lineup continues through Nov. 5 at the old-style West Duluth theater. There are three chances to see “Vertigo” (4:30 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Nov. 4 and noon Nov. 5), a 1958 film where James Stewart plays a retired police officer with a solid reason for his fear of heights and ensuing vertigo. He’s hired as a PI by a friend and charged with following the man’s wife. Cue the heights. The finale is “Rear Window” (9:15 p.m. Nov. 5), which also stars James Stewart as a photographer with a broken leg who spends his time observing his neighbors — including, he thinks, a murderer.

West Theatre’s Alfred Hitchcock retrospective runs through Nov. 5. More info: thewesttheatre.com/movies.

"Evan" by Blair Treuer (photo from Duluth Art Institute)
"Evan" by Blair Treuer (photo from Duluth Art Institute)

Art in your hand

The Duluth Art Institute is among the art spaces that have work on Smartify, an app that adds context to pieces in galleries and museums. In the case of a global pandemic that might keep some humans from walking into a museum at all, the app offers a look at what they’re missing.

In this case: artist Blair Treuer, who creates portraits from fabric, has an exhibition of her work “Identity” in the John Steffl Gallery at the DAI. Can't get there: She has work catalogued on the app, including descriptions by the artist. For instance, she describes “Self Portrait Naawakamigookwe” as being about both hope and despair as she considers what she has to offer the world.