Get those film fest vibes

This year’s Duluth Superior Film Festival has been postponed, but one of the organization’s deep connections is with the American Indian Community Housing Organization.

Photo from Independent Television Service
Photo from Independent Television Service

The two groups co-show a monthly indigenous film series. Among the events that didn’t get a chance to happen: A screening of “N. Scott Momsday: Words from A Bear.” You can recapture film fest vibes with a home screening — it’s available via PBS. The 2019 documentary is about the Pulitzer Prize winning writer-poet and shows the connection between his writing and his life experience.

"Ghostbusters" (photo by Columbia Pictures)
"Ghostbusters" (photo by Columbia Pictures)

Newsletter signup for email alerts

Ain't afraid of ghosts

Grab your ecto-whatever: Monday is National Ghostbusters Day. It marks the date, 36 years ago, when the comedy about paranormal investigators — including Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd — opened in theaters. It’s a legend that has lived on in “Ghostbusters 2,” “Ghostbusters: Answer the Call,” which featured a cast of women as the primary ‘Busters, and “Ghostbusters: Afterlife,” a prequel, which was scheduled to drop this summer, but you know. There are a lot of ways to celebrate: cue up a Ray Parker Jr. dance party — he sang the original theme song, watch one of the flicks, or tap into your stash of Ecto Cooler — the preferred way to celebrate by a local gang of Ghostbusters. Check out the trailer to Matt Rasmussen’s trailer on YouTube.

The Duluth Lynchings is a six-part podcast series produced by the Duluth News Tribune.
The Duluth Lynchings is a six-part podcast series produced by the Duluth News Tribune.

'The Duluth Lynchings' now available

It has been nearly 100 years since Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson and Isaac McGhie were lynched in front of approximately 10,000 Duluthians in response to a false rape accusation. For decades, no one said much about it. Michael Fedo studied old articles and conducted interviews to create his book, “The Lynchings in Duluth,” then passed the baton to others who have worked to bring the story to light. News Tribune reporters, including the one shamelessly writing this blurb, have spent much of 2020 interviewing dozens of sources to create a six-part podcast about the events of June 15, 1920 — and the way it still affects us today. Check out “The Duluth Lynchings” on iTunes, Spotify and more. Here is episode 3.

Franconia Sculpture Park (2018 file / News Tribune)
Franconia Sculpture Park (2018 file / News Tribune)

Art: Larger than life

Franconia Sculpture Park is acres upon acres — 43, actually — of large-scale sculptures collected in a park in the St. Croix Valley. Because of the park’s setup, it has been able to remain open during the pandemic: it’s outside, it’s easy to maintain social distance. They do ask that visitors stay 6 feet apart and wear masks, and there are golf carts available for those who need it. The exhibition includes larger-than-life animals, real and imagined, a tree house and floating house, a head and something that resembles a roller coaster track. There is always something interesting on the horizon.

Franconia Sculpture Park, 29835 St. Croix Trail, Schafer, Minnesota, is open every day from dusk to dawn. Donations accepted.

Duluth musician Gaelynn Lea. (File / News Tribune)
Duluth musician Gaelynn Lea. (File / News Tribune)

Lea offers Sunday meditation

Gaelyn Lea, the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk Concert winner, has been performing a weekly live streamed concert on her YouTube channel — a mix of music that leans meditative. Lea is a thoughtful human and world-traveling musician known for her fiddle. These quick-hit sets are from, seemingly, her home and are conversational and intimate. If you can’t make the live version, which are at 2 p.m. on Sundays, they are available for back-viewing on her page.