Charlie Parr at Duluth Cider, revisited

Unlike in real life, you don't have to miss out on significant social moments right now.

Charlie Parr (Facebook)
Charlie Parr (Facebook)

Last Wednesday, Charlie Parr performed live from a mostly empty Duluth Cider, a 90-minute performance that attracted upward of 64,000 views on Facebook Live. It was gorgeously filmed, it sounded great, and Parr was peak charming, whether trying to negotiate this empty space or talking about the jeans he wasn't going to be able to buy over the weekend.

He opened this take on his traditional "midweek bracer" with "Love is an Unraveling Bird's Nest" and closed with "Ain't No Grave," accompanied by just his own stomping foot. Said "Thanks everybody, goodnight" and walked off the stage. This might be among Duluth's most magical music moments.

The concert is still available for streaming. Or watching again and again. Donations accepted via GoFundMe.com.

Social Animals released a video for "Get Over It" and an acoustic live set on YouTube. (Photo from Facebook)
Social Animals released a video for "Get Over It" and an acoustic live set on YouTube. (Photo from Facebook)

Social distancing with Social Animals

Social Animals premiered the video for the new song “Get Over It” last week — which shows the Cloquet-raised musicians performing in a bedroom and vacant faces of addiction. Dedric Clark said of the song : “Missing someone can be addictive. Either you learn to live with that loneliness or try to find a way to get over it.”

It’s a mix of upbeat tune, grim story — created that way on purpose, according to the band.

Social Animals was touring Europe and had to cut things short because of the spread of COVID-19. Keep your eyes on the band’s Facebook page for movement. Clark recently did a pop up acoustic set live on YouTube.

Tara Austin's exhibition is available at josephneasegallery.com. (Image from Joseph Nease Gallery)
Tara Austin's exhibition is available at josephneasegallery.com. (Image from Joseph Nease Gallery)

Joseph Nease Gallery adds easy virtual option

Joseph Nease Gallery is offering an online look at its new exhibit “Boreal Ornament III” — works by Tara Austin. Viewers can easily flip through her colorful, abstract work and click for more information about specific pieces. There is also an option to buy.

Austin was raised in Northern Minnesota and claims an appreciation for botany and patterns.

Austin’s work is available through May 30. For an in-person tour, contact the gallery at director@josephneasegallery.com.

Dan Neff, artist and owner of Lake Superior Art Glass. (File / News Tribune)
Dan Neff, artist and owner of Lake Superior Art Glass. (File / News Tribune)

Lessons in glass from Dan Neff

Dan Neff of Lake Superior Art Glass is offering a daily "fireside chat," in which he creates disk ornaments, pendants, goblets and more in front of an audience, answering questions and responding to viewers as he goes along. (This requires a quick flip of his always-present eyewear.)

Neff opened the gallery-studio in 2012, and it is based in Canal Park.

On the agenda for today's 10 a.m. Facebook Live vid: a honeycomb bottle stopper. Episodes are available on the shop's Facebook page.

"Portrait of a Lady on Fire" (Photo from NEON)
"Portrait of a Lady on Fire" (Photo from NEON)

'Portrait' streaming a 18th century love affair

If you stopped going to movie theaters before seeing "Portrait of a Lady on Fire" when it screened at Zinema 2, you're in luck; it's now streaming on Hulu. The film by French director Celine Sciamma is about a slow-building love affair between an 18th century noblewoman and the woman commissioned to paint her wedding portrait.

Chris Hewitt of the Star Tribune called it a "Masterpiece"; Elle magazine called it a "queer survival guide to self-isolation."

Matt Rasmussen is the cryptkeeper-style host of "Gravedigger Dave's Halfway House," which gets a screening Sunday at Zinema 2. (photo courtesy of Keith Hopkins)
Matt Rasmussen is the cryptkeeper-style host of "Gravedigger Dave's Halfway House," which gets a screening Sunday at Zinema 2. (photo courtesy of Keith Hopkins)

St. Louis County spookiness

Keith Hopkins' premiere of his feature-length debut "Gravedigger Dave's Halfway House" played to a full theater earlier this year at Zinema 2. Now it's playing on a screen near you. The theater is offering a virtual screening and Q&A with the filmmaker at 7 p.m. April 3. Tickets are $5 and available at zeitgeistarts.com. Proceeds go to the theater.

The movie, based on old-school style shows like "Tales from the Crypt," has a collection of creepy tales from St. Louis County. Some is fictional, some is less-so. Or is it.