One hundred years ago this week, the state's barber board of examiners called for an end to a certain luxury: bushy bearded folks who liked to multitask by getting clipped and trimmed while waiting for breakfast, an open pool table or a hot tip would be out of luck.

Barbers who had set up shop in pool halls, diners and newsrooms had six weeks to take their business elsewhere.

"The stray whisker that has sometimes been blown into the soup by an electric fan, and the long red hair that once and again deflected a cross table shot into the corner pocket are bound south under official decree. In newsstands, whiskers will still be permitted on the stories in many magazines. But on the counter itself, likewise on the floor, they must be conspicuous by their absence."

According to the July 4, 1921, edition of the News Tribune, "The new sanitary regulations, patterned after those of the state of Wisconsin, will put (Minnesota) in the lead among American cities in this respect."

Barbers who broke the ruling would be charged $10 for the misdemeanor.

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Among the scenarios that would no longer be allowed, according to a reporter who was seemingly allowed poetic license: "The calls of the waiters, shouting 'Adam and Eve on a raft,' 'one egg,' or 'dumbbells and gravy' will no longer interfere with the dulcet tones of the barber, whispering, 'what tonic, sir?' or 'Now your scalp is a little loose and your hair a little stiff. Wouldn't a nice egg shampoo, etc., etc.'"

100 years ago: The ruling from the state's board of barber examiners: No more shops in pool halls, restaurants and newsrooms.
100 years ago: The ruling from the state's board of barber examiners: No more shops in pool halls, restaurants and newsrooms.