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Uber, Lyft in Duluth in April at earliest

If you urgently need space on your smartphone, it would be fine to delete those Uber and Lyft apps, at least for now. The rideshare companies have Duluth on their radar and could start service here this year, but first the city needs to get its r...

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A driver displays Uber and Lyft ride sharing signs in his car windscreen in Santa Monica, California, U.S., May 23, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson/Files
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If you urgently need space on your smartphone, it would be fine to delete those Uber and Lyft apps, at least for now.

The rideshare companies have Duluth on their radar and could start service here this year, but first the city needs to get its regulations on the books - something that won't happen until late April at the earliest.

"We look forward to working with Duluth as the city looks to put in place regulations for ridesharing so Duluth residents and visitors can experience the same benefits that ridesharing is bringing across the world," an Uber spokesperson wrote in an email.

Duluth City Councilor Noah Hobbs, who has been working with the companies in crafting a rideshare ordinance, said he hopes to get a first reading at the council's March 13 meeting. If it passes on second reading March 27 it would go into effect 30 days later.

"I've been working on this for the better part of a year, and I think it's a great option to add to the diversity of great transportation options we have in Duluth," Hobbs said.

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The councilor added that Lyft recently came to the table; the company said it has been "exploring driver interest in the area, but (we) have no plans to share at this time."

"We look forward to continuing our rapid growth across the country, and are hopeful that we'll be able to bring Lyft to Duluth in the future," Lyft spokeswoman Mary Caroline Pruitt wrote in an email.

Related Topics: TRANSPORTATION
Brooks Johnson was an enterprise/investigative reporter and business columnist at the Duluth News Tribune from 2016 to 2019.
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