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The Memo: Gerry Goldfarb to take reins of St. Paul Hotel

Have a business tip or story idea for The Memo? Send it to bbredsten@duluthnews.com.

Gerry Goldfarb SPH Lobby.jpg
Gerry Goldfarb is the new general manager of the St. Paul Hotel. He is the former general manager of the Duluth Holiday Inn.
Contributed / Morrissey Hospitality
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ST. PAUL — Gerry Goldfarb , former longtime general manager of Holiday Inn & Suites Duluth Downtown, has taken on a new role as general manager of the iconic 112-year-old St. Paul Hotel.

Prior to his return to the Twin Cities to be with his family in 2019, Goldfarb led the team for The Lion Hotel Group in Duluth. As general manager of Holiday Inn, Goldfarb oversaw a $7 million renovation that included all guest rooms, public and banquet spaces of the full-service, 338-room downtown convention property.

Brielle Bredsten The Memo

According to a July 14 press release, Goldfarb was instrumental in the addition of the Lyric Conference Center, Lyric Kitchen & Bar, and Greenery Bakery & Cafe to the property.

Goldfarb was also board chair of Visit Duluth for six years, and has nearly 30 years of hospitality experience. After leaving Duluth, he served as general manager of the 220-room Sheraton Minneapolis West.

As the general manager of the St. Paul Hotel, Goldfarb oversees overall operational and financial success of the hotel and the St. Paul Grill. He leads a management team of 21 and a staff of 225, directs operations and drives initiatives, reporting directly to Morrissey Hospitality President Richard Dobransky.

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Register for Down by Downtown by Aug. 1

DULUTH — The Downtown Duluth's Greater Downtown Council will host its 37th annual Down By Downtown celebration at Bayfront Festival Park on Aug. 16 to discuss ideas about what the next year will bring.

The Greater Downtown Council is a private, nonprofit corporation working to promote and support the development of a clean, safe and vibrant downtown Duluth. It works to enhance the waterfront business climate by bringing together business, community and government leaders to focus on downtown issues and opportunities.

The event will kick off with a social hour at 4:30 p.m. At 6 p.m., a meal with vegetarian and non-vegetarian options will be served alongside a summer watermelon salad. Dinner and the program will be followed by live music from Beer Money at 7 p.m.

Tickets must be reserved by Aug. 1. Visit https://bit.ly/3zyYOfe to register.

Free event for Duluth manufacturers

DULUTH — Manufacturers are invited to a free in-person workshop, "Creating a Culture of Continuous Improvement," on Wednesday, July 27, at Lake Superior College, 2101 Trinity Road, from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Any manufacturer who knows basic lean concepts and has implemented early steps in Value Stream Mapping, 5S and Kaizen events seeking a higher level of continuous improvement is encouraged to attend.

The event is hosted by Enterprise Minnesota , a manufacturing business consulting firm based in Minneapolis that works exclusively with small and mid-size manufacturers throughout the state to help them compete and grow profitably.

The featured speaker is Duluth resident and engineer Ally Johnston. She works with Minnesota manufacturers to improve productivity, eliminate waste and build a culture of continuous improvement. The workshop will teach Duluth-area manufacturers the value that small, daily changes can bring to an organization, and how to gain sustainable techniques to meet customer demands, improve the bottom line and retain employees.

Register at enterpriseminnesota.org/event/continuous-improvement-july-27.

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Subcontracting legislation advances to Senate

The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Strengthening Subcontracting for Small Businesses Act of 2022 ( H.R. 7694 ) in a 411-11 vote in June. It has been sent to the Senate for consideration.

The legislation amends the Small Business Act by requiring federal agencies to consider past treatment of small business subcontractors by large prime contractors when determining whether to award future contracts.

The bipartisan bill was introduced in May, co-led by U.S. Rep. Pete Stauber , R-Minn., and U.S. Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D-Md. Stauber, of Hermantown, serves on the House Small Business Committee.

While on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives,
Mfume stated that the bill essentially protects small businesses by providing incentives to large prime contractors to adhere to their pre-negotiated subcontracting plans. Those that treat small businesses fairly will have a greater chance of winning federal contracts, Mfume said.

Stauber stated in a press release: “With each passing year, it’s getting more and more difficult for small businesses to compete for federal contracts. Small businesses are the engine of our economy. In Congress it’s our duty to not only support small businesses, but also to ensure that they have a chance to participate in federal projects. At a time when small businesses are struggling with inflation, a supply chain crisis, and a labor shortage, this legislation will provide them an opportunity for success."

Brielle Bredsten is the business reporter for the Duluth News Tribune.

She earned a bachelor's degree in Professional Writing & Technical Communication, with minors in Advertising and Creative Writing from Metropolitan State University, in addition to a two-year professional paid internship as reporter/editor of the student newspaper.

She is an award-winning professional writer, photographer and editor based in rural Minnesota. Over the past decade, Brielle Bredsten has contributed more than 1,000 articles, feature stories, non-profit press-releases, photographs and columns. Her work has been published in several community newspapers.

Send her story tips, feedback or just say hi at bbredsten@duluthnews.com.
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