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Superior woman launches bean farm in Wrenshall

Jane Marynik named Four Beans Farm in honor of her four children. “I grow kids and veggies,” she said.

Jane Marynik checks her bean pods after shaking them out in her barrel at her Four Beans Farm
Jane Marynik checks her bean pods after shaking them out in her barrel at Four Beans Farm on Oct. 5.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
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WRENSHALL — Jane Marynik didn’t see herself as a farmer. But after she took a landscaping job and one of her kids was diagnosed with food allergies, Marynik switched gears.

A family smiles with a towering sunflower behind them.
Jane Marynik, second from right, poses with her family.
Contributed photo

After earning degrees in biology and environmental sustainability from University of Minnesota Duluth and volunteering on farms and UMD’s Land Lab, the Superior woman launched Four Beans Farm , named in honor of her four children.

“I grow kids and veggies,” she said.

While she tends to her carrots, cabbage, squash-plus close to home, her bean operation is about 25 miles away: a half-acre in the middle of a potato field at Wrenshall’s Food Farm. And it’s kind of like farming times two.

The weather and soil conditions are considerably different. It’s closer to clay at home, and already cultivated and nutrient-rich in Wrenshall.

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Jane Marynik shows some of her Calypso beans at her Four Beans Farm
Jane Marynik shows some of her calypso beans at Four Beans Farm on Oct. 5.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram

At her house, it’s about 15 degrees cooler than at her patch of Minnesota land. “I have two different weather forecasts on my phone,” she said.

Jane Marynik shakes dried black beans out of their pods into her barrel
Jane Marynik shakes dried black beans out of their pods at Four Beans Farm on Oct. 5.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram

Marynik hopes to have a permanent space for Four Beans, but for now, she’s so appreciative to have a spot at Food Farm.

Today, she grows black and white calypso bean; maroon with white Jacob’s cattle; and white with maroon speckling Lina Sisco bird egg. “When you cook it, it’s really creamy on the inside,” Marynik said of the latter.

Marynik primarily sells her dried beans through the Twin Ports REKO Ring , and she belongs to the North Shore Farmers Collective , which sells their goods as part of a monthly subscription box.

Marfax beans sit in a bucket at Four Beans Farm
Marfax beans at Four Beans Farm.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram

Four Beans Farm is woman-run and family-harvested. Everyone comes out to help, and the two youngest kids work for ice cream, Marynik said, and it’s common for her to work away by headlamp and lantern.

“Farming is meaningful work, and for me, the way I want to grow, aims not only to support the environment, but leaves a better place for them,” she said.

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A bucket of Lina Cisco Bird Egg beans rests at Four Beans Farm
A bucket of Lina Sisco bird egg beans at Four Beans Farm.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
Jane Marynik drops some of her Jacob Cattle beans back into the bucket at her Four Beans Farm
Jane Marynik drops Jacob's cattle beans into a bucket at Four Beans Farm on Oct. 5.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
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Melinda Lavine is an award-winning, multidisciplinary journalist with 16 years professional experience. She joined the Duluth News Tribune in 2014, and today, she writes about the heartbeat of our community: the people.

Melinda grew up in central North Dakota, a first-generation American and the daughter of a military dad.

She earned bachelors degrees in English and Communications from the University of North Dakota in 2006, and started her career at the Grand Forks (N.D.) Herald that summer. She helped launch the Herald's features section, as the editor, before moving north to do the same at the DNT.

Contact her: 218-723-5346, mlavine@duluthnews.com.
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