Dashboard measures pandemic's impact

By now, I'm sure you're familiar with the state's COVID-19 case count dashboard. (If you're not, it's definitely worth your time.)

Now, there's a dashboard for COVID-19's financial impact on Minnesota.

Thanks to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, you can check out changes in job posting numbers, unemployment percentages by race, changes in the number of restaurant diners and more.

Many of their charts include data from nearby states, leading to some interesting comparisons.

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You can access this dashboard on the federal reserve's website, minneapolisfed.org.

A donation

In addition to its personal protective equipment manufacturing, Duluth Pack is focusing even more resources on health care workers.

It's donating more than $7,200 to St. Luke's hospital and Essentia Health's personal protective equipment funds, according to a news release.

Its "Help a Hero" campaign funded the donation. For every $150 pre-tax order made in the Canal Park store and on its website, Duluth Pack contributed $5 to the campaign.

If you've followed our business coverage in recent months, you know that Duluth Pack has made thousands of reusable hospital gowns for hospitals across the U.S. It plans to continue making them long-term.

Job seekers

Some employers are struggling to find workers, and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development says there are several reasons for this.

Employers desperate for staff include health care, hospitality, retail and food-service industries.

One reason involves workers who are waiting to be called back to their former job. These workers may not want any other role than their former one, according to DEED.

There are also health concerns among employees, especially those who are in at-risk demographic categories or work in public-facing roles.

And there may be workers who are waiting for additional unemployment or stimulus checks, a news release from DEED says.

Seeking farmland

The Duluth Folk School has a grand idea.

Due to significant growth, it's searching for a rural land on which to build a new home.

They're dreaming of a parcel of land that gives them room for buildings, classrooms, gardens, trails, workshops, a barn, farmland, access to water and a sugar bush. But, most importantly, they want more room to grow.

An illustration of the Duluth Folk School's dream campus. (Courtesy of the Duluth Folk School)
An illustration of the Duluth Folk School's dream campus. (Courtesy of the Duluth Folk School)

Since its start in 2016, the folk school has taught thousands of students, according to a news release.

"Some of you have experienced the noise, hubbub, and energy of having a busy cafe and a busy folk school in the same place. It has been fun, but it has also made things challenging," the release said.

If you know of a piece of land or farmland that may work, contact folk school Director Bryan French at bryan@duluthfolkschool.com.

Kelly Busche covers business and health for the News Tribune. The best version of her favorite drink, a vanilla, oat milk latte, in the Twin Ports can be found at the Duluth Folk School.