HomeGoods opening

The date has been set. The store has been stocked.

HomeGoods is opening in the Duluth Strip mall March 29 at 8 a.m.

As we reported in late January, the home decor store is located next to T.J. Maxx. Both companies are housed under TJX Companies, which also manages Marshalls, Sierra and more.

The location is seeking around 65 full- and part-time employees. TJX has some of these positions posted at tjxjobs.com.

COVID-19 resources

It wouldn't be a timely business column without mentioning COVID-19.

The center for infectious diseases at the University of Minnesota launched an online resource for businesses.

Here, you can find lists of resources offering guidance on everything from protecting workers during a pandemic, to how to plan for the virus, to decontaminating a non-healthcare setting, and much, much more.

Head to cidrap.umn.edu/covid-19 and navigate to “employer information” to access the resources.

And, remember, the premier way to protect against the virus is by washing your hands — preferably as long as it takes you to sing the chorus of “Raspberry Beret.”

Business fund at UMD

A student-led investment fund has passed the $2 million mark in assets under management, according to a news release from the University of Minnesota Duluth.

Students in LSBE’s Financial Markets Program deserve all the credit for this one. During the year they find new investment ideas, present these ideas to an oversight committee, manage portfolio positions and exposures, and reports on the fund’s performance and attribution.

Rightfully so, the fund is called the Bulldog Fund, LLC. It was launched in 2003.

Hemp grower applications

Although making up a small sliver of our area’s industries, hemp growing and processing is one that’s certainly growing.

If you want to get in on this “exploding” industry, you’ll need to submit an application to grow the plant by March 31.

Growers and processors often use the plants to make hemp byproduct CBD, which many claim reduces anxiety, inflammation, sleeplessness and pain.

While these leafy plants can also produce marijuana, hemp plants in the U.S. must have less than a 0.3 percent THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, level. THC is the chemical in marijuana that causes its mind-altering side effects.

Last year, 550 people had licenses to grow or process hemp — do you think we will see more?

Kelly Busche covers business and the health care industry for the News Tribune. Let her know if you plan to grow or process hemp at kbusche@duluthnews.com.