Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Photo essay: Turning eyes to the sky

Josh Wasniewski, a student at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, watches as Tate Petrowuski, 10, of Foley enjoys views of Saturn through an 8-inch telescope in Canal Park on a recent Friday night. The full moon is at top center. At right are Josh (Tate's father) and Ty, 13. Members of the Arrowhead Astronomical Society routinely set up their telescopes for public viewing of the moon and planets on Friday and Saturday nights during the summer and fall when weather permits. (Bob King / rking@duluthnews.com)1 / 4
Eric Norland, Arrowhead Astronomical Society moderator, draws the planet Jupiter with chalk on the sidewalk in Canal Park on a recent weekend evening. He was creating a simple scale model of the solar system for passersby. (Bob King / rking@duluthnews.com)2 / 4
Amateur astronomer James Schaff of Lakewood Township totes his telescope tube back to his car at the conclusion of public observing in Canal Park earlier this summer. (Bob King / rking@duluthnews.com)3 / 4
People line up to see the planet Saturn through Rodger Acker's telescope on a recent July night in Canal Park. Members of the Arrowhead Astronomical Society routinely set up their telescopes to share views of the moon and planets with passersby along the Canal Park Lakewalk near the former Crabby Bill's on Friday and Saturday nights when weather permits. Check @DuluthAstro on Twitter for times and updates. 4 / 4

Turning eyes to the sky

Gideon Johnston, 13, of St. Paul reacts to seeing Venus through one of the Arrowhead Astronomical Society's telescopes.

Amateur astronomers love to share the night sky with people who have never looked through a telescope. When the weather’s right, you’ll find members of Duluth’s Arrowhead Astronomical Society doing just that on the Lakewalk in Canal Park on Friday and Saturday nights in the summer and fall. People often open up and get philosophical after looking at Saturn or the craters of the moon. This can lead to deep discussions and connections with folks who were perfect strangers just moments before. We all like to wonder about origins, endings and life elsewhere in the universe. Stars help us discover this common thread.

Photos by Bob King / rking@duluthnews.com

Advertisement
randomness