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Faces for Nov. 15, 2015

The Lumen Christi Glow Run took place in early October at Assumption Catholic School in Hibbing and raised more $19,000. Proceeds benefit Assumption Catholic School. 1 / 21
Molly Bergum and Lorena Lane of Superior were selected as Student Rotarians for October by the Superior Rotary Club. Bergum and Lane are seniors at Superior High School, members of the National Honor Society, the Spartan girls cross-country team, other school activities and organizations, and participate in the Superior-Douglas County Chamber of Commerce Youth Leadership Program.2 / 21
Super One Foods won Food Donor of the Year from Second Harvest Northern Food Bank as part of the Hunger Action Month awards.3 / 21
Fitgers won Financial Donor of the Year from Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank as part of their Hunger Action Month awards.4 / 21
Laura Plys won the honorary Gen Boysen Volunteer of the Year award from Second Harvest Northern Food Bank as part of their Hunger Action Month awards.5 / 21
Wade Petrich won the Michael E. Miner Board Leadership Award from Second Harvest Northern Food Bank as part of their Hunger Action Month awards.6 / 21
Hibbing Salvation Army won Agency Partner of the Year from Second Harvest Northern Food Bank as part of its Hunger Action Month awards.7 / 21
College of St. Scholastica students and members of First United Methodist Church made and sold pumpkin pies and muffins on Oct. 7, generating $1,500 for the CHUM food shelf.8 / 21
Port of Duluth Kiwanis donated $1,600 to Positive Energy Outdoors from its annual Taste of Italy dinner held at Valentini’s Restaurant in Duluth. 9 / 21
From left to right, Stephanie Puffer, Lakeview Christian Academy board of directors; Dave LeMaster, LCA board of directors; Matt Krall, Kwik Trip store manager; Julia Rivard, LCA resource faculty; Pete Franzen, LCA board of directors president; Todd Benson, LCA head of school; Candy Pappas, LCA resource faculty; Anna Moore, LCA resource faculty; and Bryan Wentworth, LCA resource faculty pose after Kwik Trip presented LCA with a check for $5,000 on Oct. 29. 10 / 21
Elizabeth Bartel, a teacher at Lakewood Elementary School in Duluth, was awarded Formal Environmental Educator of the Year by the Minnesota Association of Environmental Education during the Oct. 24 Midwest Environmental Education Conference in Madison.11 / 21
Upper Lakes Foods committed $15,000 to the food bank’s “Full Tanks to Full Tummies” truck sponsorship to help underwrite the cost of its rescue and food distribution throughout northeast Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin. Pictured are: (from left) Shaye Moris of Second Harvest and Sue Ryan and Craig Ryan of Upper Lakes Foods. 12 / 21
Northland Subway contributed $4,348 and 1,214 pounds of food as part of a one-day spring fundraising event. Their gift will provide 22,711 meals for Northland residents in need. Pictured are: (from left) Brian Haedrich, Shaye Moris of Second Harvest and Mike Jones.13 / 21
The Benedictine Sisters of St. Scholastica Monastery contributed $3,000 for the rescue and distribution of 15,000 meals for northeastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin families in need. Pictured are: (from left) Sisters Claudia Cherro, Lois Eckes, Prioress, and and Pauline Micke. 14 / 21
Haugland15 / 21
Chi16 / 21
Jauch17 / 21
Fletcher18 / 21
Hoag19 / 21
Pierce20 / 21
Prettner Solon21 / 21

DONATIONS

Port of Duluth Kiwanis donated $1,600 to Positive Energy Outdoors from its annual Taste of Italy dinner held at Valentini’s Restaurant in Duluth. The money will be used to fund camp scholarships for families that qualify for free or reduced lunch. Partial scholarships of up to $150 are available, and families with greater needs can request money. Camp scholarships are first-come, first-served and are available for children in grades K-8, including activities such as driving draft horses, rock climbing, kayaking, stand-up paddling, hiking, a girls-only camp and a special middle school camp. Two adventure camps for teens in grades 7-12 are also available, and all camps have an online registration option.

  • Jeff Foster Trucking employees donated $500 to Miller-Dwan Foundation’s Caring Ways Cancer Resource Center Oct. 28. Money raised came from Jeff Foster’s annual Truck Driver Appreciation Week celebration in September, when employees paid $1 per throw to dunk CEO Leo Naumann and others. Jeff Foster Trucking employees Eric Johannesson and Miriam Hanson presented Caring Ways Cancer Resource Center with the giant check worth $500. The resource center helps survivors deal with physical, psychological, social and spiritual impacts of cancer that arise at any stage in their journeys.

    • Kwik Trip, located at 6 W. Central Entrance, presented Lakeview Christian Academy with a check for $5,000 Oct. 29. The money benefited the resource program of the school. Store manager Matt Krall presented the contribution on behalf of Kwik Trip, Inc., while Lakeview Christian Academy’s head of school Todd Benson and the Lakeview Christian Academy Board of Directors received the gift.The Northland Campus of Minnesota Adult and Teen Challenge received a $1,250 check from the Lake Superior Chapter of the Seed of Abraham Motorcycle Club and the Soldiers for Jesus Motorcycle Club of Hibbing on Oct. 3.

    • Second Harvest Northern Food Bank announced the following:
      The Benedictine Sisters of St. Scholastica Monastery contributed $3,000 for the rescue and distribution of 15,000 meals for northeastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin families in need. Pictured are: (from left) Sisters Claudia Cherro, Lois Eckes, Prioress, and and Pauline Micke.
      Upper Lakes Foods committed $15,000 to the food bank’s “Full Tanks to Full Tummies” truck sponsorship to help underwrite the cost of its rescue and food distribution throughout northeast Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin. Pictured are: (from left) Shaye Moris of Second Harvest and Sue Ryan and Craig Ryan of Upper Lakes Foods.
      Northland Subway contributed $4,348 and 1,214 pounds of food as part of a one-day spring fundraising event. Their gift will provide 22,711 meals for Northland residents in need. Pictured are: (from left) Brian Haedrich, Shaye Moris of Second Harvest and Mike Jones.

    • Circle of Hope received a donation of $713 from Health Source to be used for a private pink party for breast cancer patients this winter. Circle of Hope also received $125 from Infinity Massage and Wellness and $108 from the American Endowment Foundation to be used for patients bills.

    • The recent We Scare Hunger food drive in Willow River collected 1,528 items plus $45 in cash. The event was sponsored by the Willow River We Act Group and items will be equally distributed between the Moose Lake Food Shelf and the Sandstone Family Pathways Food Bank.

    GOOD PEOPLE

    • College of St. Scholastica students and members of First United Methodist Church made and sold pumpkin pies and muffins on Oct. 7, generating $1,500 for the CHUM food shelf.

    • Mavis Keller was honored for earning the President’s Volunteer Service Award on Friday. A Duluth resident, Keller has been a Meals on Wheels Volunteer at Ecumen Lakeshore since 2006, where she has contributed 4,559 volunteer hours. The President’s Volunteer Service Award recognizes and honors volunteers who set outstanding examples that inspire community service and volunteerism.

    GOOD NEWS

    • The Lumen Christi Glow Run took place in early October at Assumption Catholic School in Hibbing and raised more $19,000. Students in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade began fundraising in early September by going out into the community and asking for pledges. Students ran laps around the school track ranked by grade and illuminated the school’s field wearing glow bracelets, necklaces, face paint and other various glowing items earned through fundraising. The top two earners were fifth grader Abigail Sullivan and sixth grader Wyatt Collins, who were rewarded with bikes provided by Nelson Roofing/K Building Components. Proceeds benefit Assumption Catholic School.

    • Life House secured more than $1 million from federal, state and local sources to support youths ages 16-24 who are victims of sexual exploitation and trafficking or fleeing domestic violence in 2015. Contributions included: $637,000 from the Department of Human Services; $343,000 from the federal Office on Violence Against Women; $30,000 from the Butler Family Foundation through the Northland Foundation; and $25,000 from the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota. To provide the appropriate services to this vulnerable population, Life House partners with Safe Haven Shelter for Battered Women and Program for Aid to Victims.

    • On Sept. 26 ARTcetera raised more than $180,000 to transform the Miller-Dwan building's Adult Inpatient Behavioral Health Unit into a warm, welcoming leading-edge healing environment. People are welcome to continue contributing to the campaign by contacting the Healing Space Campaign office at (218) 628-5829 or visiting mdfoundation.org.

    COMMUNITY LEADERS

    • Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank announced the following winners of Hunger Action Month awards:

    Fitgers won Financial Donor of the Year. Supporting Second Harvest for the past 21 years through their Taste of Fitgers event, Fitgers has raised more than $600,00 and provided more than 3 million meals for people in need. Fitgers has also supported Second Harvest with its annual “Fitgers Photos with Santa,” 5K events and other promotions.

    Super One Foods has been a supporter for many years and was presented with the Food Donor of the Year award. Super One donates food from 13 stores and local warehouse. Over the past 18 years they've provided more than 1.5 million meals.

    Laura Plys won the honorary Gene Boysen Volunteer of the Year award. Plys has volunteered with Second Harvest since 2012. She annually hosts "Project Joy,” an event that raises awareness and money for the BackPack Program. Plys represents Project Joy throughout the year, volunteering to pack food for the BackPack Program, engaging and inspiring others to support our work and as one of the region's best advocates against child hunger.

    Wade Petrich won the Michael E. Miner Board Leadership Award. Petrich is a Second Harvest board member and is a well-connected member of the community. He has served on Second Harvest’s our Taste at Fitger's committee, volunteers with other food bank activities and is currently chairing our new Community Engagement Committee.

    Hibbing Salvation Army won Agency Partner of the Year. A leader in the local nonprofit field, Hibbing Salvation Army provides dignified and respectful food shelf service and meals to people throughout the Hibbing area. Over the last year, the Hibbing Salvation Army organization has distributed almost 500,000 pounds of food or the equivalent of 400,000 meals to those in need.

    Harvest Northern Food Bank as part of its Hunger Action Month awards.

    • Molly Bergum and Lorena Lane of Superior were selected as Student Rotarians for October by the Superior Rotary Club. Bergum and Lane are seniors at Superior High School, members of the National Honor Society, the Spartan girls cross-country team, other school activities and organizations, and participate in the Superior-Douglas County Chamber of Commerce Youth Leadership Program.
      Bergum is the daughter of Kelly and Kent Bergum and plans to attend either the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities or the University of Iowa to study environmental science.
      Lane plans to attend either the College of St. Scholastica or the University of Minnesota Duluth to major in psychology or speech pathology.

    • Generations Health Care Initiatives announced new board members Jo Ann Hoag, Julie Pierce and Yvonne Prettner Solon. The organization also announced its officers for the upcoming year: Randy Lasky was named board chair; Lynn Goerdt was named vice chair; and Deborah Medlin was named secretary/treasurer.
      Hoag is a retired healthcare executive from St. Luke's and Lake View Surgical Center; Pierce is director of power supply for Minnesota Power; and Prettner Solon is a clinical psychologist and former Minnesota Lieutenant Governor, State Senator and Duluth City Councillor.

    • EDUCATION NOTES

    • Elizabeth Bartel, a teacher at Lakewood Elementary School in Duluth, was awarded Formal Environmental Educator of the Year by the Minnesota Association of Environmental Education during the Oct. 24 Midwest Environmental Education Conference in Madison. Bartel worked to designate 7.5 wooded acres adjacent to the school as a Minnesota School Forest through the Department of Natural Resources in 1994. Lakewood School Forest now has a trail system, outdoor classroom, bridges, signs and trail markers.
      She has worked extensively with the DNR and created a healthy and safe outdoor classroom for Lakewood for more than 20 years. Bartel has also worked with families and faculty during a buckthorn removal event, directed a student-led recycling and carbon footprint reduction project, assisted in developing the school’s first environmental education day and brought professional development opportunities to staff by partnering with the DNR to bring Project Learning Tree to Lakewood.

    • Lake Superior College was identified as one of the most affordable online paralegal degree programs by online-paralegal-degree.org in October. The website examined 117 schools based on two-year and four-year degree offerings in legal assistant and paralegal studies. All programs were delivered 100 percent online or in a distance learning format. Lake Superior College came in at No. 27 and is 1 of 3 Minnesota schools on the list.

    • The University of Wisconsin-Superior Alumni Association honored Diana Chi, Bob Jauch, John Haugland and Stefan Fletcher at their annual 2015 Donor Appreciation Dinner held Oct. 1.
      Chi, who came to UWS from Hong Kong and graduated with honors in 1974 and 1976, won the Distinguished Alumni Award. She earned the Outstanding Woman Student Award in 1975 and is a former member of American Women in Radio and Television. Chi has worked at KTLA-TV in Los Angeles for 29 years as a writer and producer and has earned a number of industry awards for her news writing, including the Mark Twain Award from the Associated Press, Emmy Awards from the Academy of Television of Arts and Sciences, and Golden Mikes from the Radio Television News Association of Southern California.

    Jauch won the Honorary Alumni Award. While at UWS, Jauch was the executive director of the United Council of University of Wisconsin Students and was an advocate for the unique rights of students, especially the right to participate directly in university governance. Jauch also helped establish student seats on university committees, direct student management of segregated fees, and student seats on the Board of Regents.
    As field representative for U.S. Rep. David Obey, Bob was involved in helping guide the university’s pursuit of federal grants. As state representative, Senator and Senate Leader, Jauch was the university’s consistent and tireless voice in Madison.

    Haugland won the James Rainaldo Mentor Award and is an alumnus, distinguished faculty member and emeritus vice chancellor of UWS. He held a variety of positions, including history professor, academic affairs vice president and dean of faculty. Haugland was vice chancellor from 1968-89, the majority of his career.
    Fletcher, a member of the Class of 2008, won the Young Alumni Achievement Award. He served as president of the student government association, co-chaired the design committee for the Yellowjacket Union and led successful advocacy efforts to ensure state financial support for the Swenson Hall Building. Fletcher also served on a number of other committees, including the Jim Dan Hill Library Renovation Committee, Strategic Planning Budgetary Committee and Swenson Hall Design Committee. He was a recipient of the Chancellor’s Leadership Award and Inspiring Student leader Award, and received his juris doctor from Michigan State University College of Law. Fletcher works for the University of Wisconsin System as the special assistant for the senior vice president for administration and fiscal policies and has also worked as a policy analyst and communication specialist for the UW System.

    • Victory Media recognized The University of Minnesota Duluth and the University of Wisconsin-Superior as Military Friendly Schools. The Military Friendly Schools designation is awarded to the top colleges, universities, community colleges and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace military students and dedicate resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation.

    GRANTS

    • The University of Wisconsin-Superior received a $15,000 grant from Northland Foundation that will be used to award Minnesota students attending the university and are participating in an internship. The grant is a local match for the ’Jacket Internship Financial Assistance program, and will make internships paid for selected students.
      UWS also received a career ready internship grant of $317,454 from the Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corp. that will benefit students by offering opportunities to gain invaluable, real-world experience through paid internships in their fields of study and covers from October through May 2015-18. An anticipated 240 new paid internships for juniors and seniors who don’t receive enough financial aid to cover college expenses will be created during this three-year period at UWS.

    • The Duluth PTSA Council was awarded a $10,000 grant from the National PTA and the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation to address an early childhood school readiness program titled “Smart From the Start.” The program was implemented in June 2014 and ended in September. Goals of the program were to educate families of kids ages 3-5 about practical ways to ensure their children achieve a balanced intake of nutritious foods, physical activity every day and mobilize community-based stakeholders to focus on increasing access to nutritious foods and physical activity options in the community.

    • Holy Rosary School received a $4,159 grant from the Diocese of Duluth’s Catholic Religious Education Endowment Fund for need-based tuition assistance. The CREED Fund provides financial support of educational opportunities for the enrichment of the faith and spreading of the gospel by laity, deacons, priests and Catholic schools in the Diocese of Duluth.

    • The Lighthouse Center for Vision Loss received $253,102 from the Minnesota DHS Live Well at Home initiative. The award is for the Lighthouse’s Safe at Home with Vision Loss initiative. The project is helping Northland seniors with vision loss learn new ways to do things without vision.

    • Northland Foundation announced $403,613 to area nonprofits and schools. In addition, the Northland Foundation provided critical school supplies to eight school districts whose student populations qualified for free or reduced cost lunch.
      AGING: Duluth Art Institute, $5,000 to provide arts programming to older adults with memory loss; Wrenshall School, $1,000 to support kindergarten transition programming; Care Partners of Cook County, Grand Marais, $4,300 to develop marketing and outreach materials for services to older adults and their caregivers; Kairos Alive!, Minneapolis, $5,000 to support intergenerational arts programming in Aitkin county and the city of Duluth; Arrowhead Regional Development Commission, Duluth, $25,000 to support work to improve the delivery of services to older adults and their caregivers on the Iron Range; White Community Hospital Foundation, Aurora, $5,000 to support the implementation of the Vial of Life program in the Hoyt Lakes area
      CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES: Moose Lake Schools, $4,000 to engage older adults in helping boost academic achievement; Proctor Public Schools, $4,000 to engage older adults in helping boost academic achievement; McGregor KIDS PLUS/Something Cool Inc., $4,000 to engage older adults in helping boost academic achievement; Hartley Nature Center, Duluth, $15,257 to provide resources to encourage the regular incorporation of nature play into early childhood education programs serving low-income children.
      Northeastern Minnesota Schools, PreK-Grade 3 Team Grants, $19,993: McGregor Schools, $1,000; Barnum Schools, $1,000; Silver Bay Early Childhood Coalition, $1,000; Duluth Public Schools Academy, $1,000; Happy Days Preschool, Ely, $1,000; Proctor Public Schools, $1,000; Esko Public Schools, $1,000; Moose Lake Schools, $1,000; Invest Early, Grand Rapids, $4,000; Duluth Public Schools, $4,000;International Falls Schools, $993; Cloquet Public Schools, $1,000; Mesabi East Early Childhood Coalition, Aurora, $1,000; Lake Superior School District, Two Harbors, $1,000.
      Duluth Head Start, $5,000 to increase the cultural competency of Duluth Head Start staff and to pilot a Dads parent group.
      Moose Lake Schools, $4,134 to provide the Love and Logic training to parents in the Moose Lake area.
      Lincoln Park Children and Families Collaborative, Duluth, $15,000 to support for early childhood programming in the Lincoln Park neighborhood.
      Duluth Early Childhood Family Education, $1,010 to provide a support group for families of children with special needs.
      Calumet Public Library, $2,500 to provide enriching out-of-school-time programming in the Calumet area.
      Duluth Public Schools, $5,000 to provide supportive services to first-time parents with special needs.
      Aitkin Public Schools, $30,000 to support out of school time activities for Aitkin area youth.
      GND Development Alliance, Duluth, $15,000 to support community enrichment programming in the Gary-New Duluth neighborhood.
      Volunteers In Education Inc., Soudan, $20,000 to support the hiring of a new executive director.
      Congdon Park School, Duluth, $3,000 to support transportation for afterschool programs to improve Academic achievement.
      Society of American Foresters Lake Superior Chapter, Cloquet, $1,000 to support the Forestry Field Day for fifth-grade students.
      Duluth Public Schools, $4,950 for in- and out-of-school-time enrichment activities at Lowell, Piedmont, and Lincoln Park Schools.
      South Ridge School, Virginia $4,500 for out-of-school-time activities in the Virginia area.
      Harbor City International Charter School, Duluth $5,000 to support the Literacy Intervention Program for high school students who are reading below grade level.
      Nashwauk-Keewatin Library, Nashwauk, $3,000 to provide enriching out-of-school-time programming in the Nashwauk Keewatin area.
      Children's Dental Services, Inc., Minneapolis, $10,000 to provide low-income children in northeastern Minnesota with access to dental care.
      Human Development Center Foundation, Duluth, $4,800 to provide staff development training to improve services to children with mental illness.
      SciMathMN, St. Paul, $1,500 to improve the quality of STEM education in northeastern Minnesota.
      Northeastern Minnesota Schools, 8 Schools/Districts, $5,261: Duluth Public Schools, $2,517; Hill City KIDS PLUS, $415; Aitkin KIDS PLUS, $366; International Falls KIDS PLUS, $417; McGregor KIDS PLUS/Something Cool Inc., $408; Bovey/Coleraine KIDS PLUS, $327; Bigfork Public School, $408; Mountain Iron Buhl School District, $403.
      COMMUNITY VITALITY: United Way of Northeastern Minnesota, Chisholm, $6,250 to support for technology upgrades; APEX, Duluth, $607 in support of the Transition/Succession Seminar held May 18; WDSE-WRPT, Duluth, $3,000 in support of public affairs programming in northeastern Minnesota; Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, St. Paul, $550 to offer membership support for programs and activities in northeastern Minnesota.
      SELF-RELIANCE: SOAR Career Solutions, Duluth $5,000 to provide gap funding for services to people exiting incarceration; Grand Rapids Human Rights Commission,  $1,000 to support the first Indigenous People's Day in Grand Rapids; Arc Northland, Duluth, $15,000 to provide support and advocacy for children with disabilities and their families; Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota, Duluth, $60,000 to provide services to youth who are homeless or at risk of homelessness; Minnesota Coalition for the Homeless, St. Paul, $1,000 to provide scholarship opportunities for the Minnesota Coalition for Homeless annual conference; Second Harvest North Central Food Bank,  Grand Rapids, $10,000 to support for the backpack program to provide food for children in need in Aitkin and Itasca counties; Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank, Duluth, $4,500 to increase understanding about the dynamics of poverty to northeastern Minnesota organizations working on hunger relief; Range Transitional Housing Inc., Virginia, $1,500 to support the northern St. Louis County Community Connect event; Minnesota Coalition for the Homeless, St. Paul, $5,000 to support efforts to work with Native Nations in northeastern Minnesota to address issues of homelessness; All Nations Indigenous Center Inc., Duluth, $5,000 to help in the formation and strengthening of an organization dedicated to addressing issues facing Indigenous people; Lake Vermilion Guides League, Soudan, $500 in support of the second annual Take a Wounded or Senior Vet Fishing event.

    • The Arrowhead Regional Arts Council approved $20,000 in McKnight/Arrowhead Regional Arts Council Technology/Equipment Grants. The artists and activities funded are as follows:
      Technology/Equipment Grant
      Lucie Amundson, Duluth, $1,640 to purchase a MacBook Pro, a printer and a means to automatically backup files enabling her to continue a career as a professional writer of creative nonfiction.
      Jon Brophy, Duluth, $2,000 to purchase professional drafting and rendering software to assist in doing theatrical lighting design.
      Patricia Canelake, Knife River, $1,870 to purchase a new camera to improve documentation of paintings, create images for a new website and take source photographs for future paintings.
      Angie Frank, Duluth, $2,000 to hire the services of a Web design company to build a website highlighting her theater work and hire a photographer to produce high-quality photographs of her facilitating theater work.
      Brett Grandson, Duluth, $1,388 to purchase an ultraviolet light box to make handcrafted photographic prints and double the size of the prints he is currently able to be produce.
      Paula Gudmundson, Duluth, $2,000 to purchase Nasut Baroque and Renaissance flutes for the development of a concert series titled "Klezmer meets Tango," which will focus on introducing audiences to folk music traditions.
      Bryan Hansel, Duluth, $1,560 to purchase two wide-angle, fast prime camera lenses to enable the photographing of the night sky and other low-light subjects.
      Dawn LaPointe, Duluth, $862 to purchase various high quality filters for camera lenses to assist in creating longer exposure photographs in challenging light.
      Matthew Mobley, Duluth, $1,700 to purchase a 150 year-old, hand-carved European double bass to play with numerous bands at local and regional venues.
      David Moreira, Duluth, $2,000 to purchase an interactive pen display and a professional graphics tablet to upgrade decade-old technology for graphic design.
      Carolyn Olson, Duluth, $990 to purchase a camera to take high quality photographs of paintings, drawings and sculptures to post on her website and exhibition proposals.
      Matt Wasmund, Duluth, $1,990 to purchase an audio interface, external hard drive, microphones and microphone accessories to capture live recordings of original music pieces.

    • U.S. Bank Duluth awarded the Head of the Lakes United Way a $16,784 grant from the U.S. Bank Foundation. The grant includes donations from employees and collections from local fundraising efforts.

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