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Minnesota launches pollinator education effort

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News Duluth,Minnesota 55802
Duluth News Tribune
Minnesota launches pollinator education effort
Duluth Minnesota 424 W. First St. 55802

ST. PAUL — Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson promises to plant more flowers.

It is part of a new program his department launched at the State Fair on Thursday to encourage Minnesotans to provide good homes to bees, wasps, butterflies and other insects that pollinate plants.


Pollinators’ numbers are falling and scientists do not know all the causes, although some pesticide use is suspected as one problem.

“More than one-third of all plants are plant products that we consume are directly or indirectly dependent on insects for pollination, and a decline in pollinators negatively affects us all,” Frederickson said.

Participants in the program are asked to join Frederickson and pledge to take an action to help pollinators.

Frederickson said his department will focus on educating the public about how regular Minnesotans can help. His promise to plant more flowers may be a popular way to help, but he also suggested letting dandelions grow because bees like them.

Other ideas the commissioner offered include leaving areas of a lawn unmowed, reducing pesticide use, setting out water bowls to give pollinators a drink and to start a beehive.

Besides pesticides, parasites and diseases are among factors believed to be causing the pollinator decline.

There still is too little known about bees and other pollinators, said Marla Spivak, a nationally known bee expert from the University of Minnesota.

While about a third of Minnesota honeybee colonies are lost each year, Spivak said that native bee population trends are not well understood (honeybees are not native to the state). However, she added, studies on the topic are beginning.

Of Minnesota’s 18 or 19 bumble beespecies, she said, two “are very endangered.”

Frederickson and legislators at Thursday’s announcement said Minnesota has passed more bee-related laws than any other state. For instance, it now is illegal to label a product as bee friendly if it really can harm the insects. Also, state agencies are required to take bee-friendly actions, such as improving habitat.

The issue is well known in rural areas, where farmers need pollinators for their crops. But state Rep. Jean Wagenius, D-Minneapolis, said she has been hearing about it in her urban area as she goes door-to-door campaigning.

Rep. Rick Hanson, D-South St. Paul, said that lawmakers will take more actions to help pollinators, but urged common Minnesotans to help, too.

“Give bees a chance,” he pleaded.

Don Davis
Don Davis has been the Forum Communications Minnesota Capitol Bureau chief since 2001, covering state government and politics for two dozen newspapers in the state. Don also blogs at Capital Chatter on Areavoices.