Sections

Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement
Lundeen Productions’ “Pippin” is a Charlemagne-era story with a 1970s pop soundtrack. Photo by Alan Johnson Photography

Best Bets: Lundeen Productions presents ‘Pippin’

Email Sign up for Breaking News Alerts
a&e Duluth, 55802
Duluth News Tribune
(218) 723-5295 customer support
Duluth Minnesota 424 W. First St. 55802

Pippin, the son of Charlemagne, is a boy in search of himself — or rather, his “corner of the sky” — in Lundeen Productions’ “Pippin,” which opens Wednesday at Harbor City International School’s theater.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The show is set in 780 A.D., but has a decidedly non-Roman Empire-ness to it. Consider the soundtrack, which has a feel-good pop music, flower-painted bus, mustard-hued vibe, including songs like “Magic to Do” and “I Guess I’ll Miss the Man.”

The original “Pippin” opened in 1972 with Bob Fosse as director and choreographer and won heaps of Tony Awards. This production takes its cues from Fosse’s version — with Jennifer Madill Hagen’s touch.

Erin Miller, who recently graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a degree in musical theater, plays the title role.

A revival of “Pippin” opened in 2013 at Music Box in New York City. That circus-centered version directed by Diane Paulus was billed as “‘Soul Train’ meets ‘Cirque du Soleil’” by the New Yorker.

Go see it What: Lundeen Productions’ “Pippin,” directed by Sheryl Jensen

When: Opens 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through July 12, July 17-19 and July 23-26; 2 p.m. July 20

Where: Harbor City International School Theater, 332 W. Michigan St.

Tickets: Start at $18; available at lundeenproductions.com

Best Bets: Time to get all red, white and blue-y

Best Bets: Fourth annual ‘Party in the Park’ with Hairball

Best Bets: The Hold Steady plays Clyde Iron

Best Bets: Andy Kindler brings his comedy to Teatro Zuccone

Best Bets: James Harper art exhibition opens at Pizza Luce

Best Bets: Rachael Kilgour plays sad songs on Saturday

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness